Stories about: Vein of Galen Malformation

All roads lead to Boston for South Carolina parents-to-be

Vein of GalenWhen you’re a South Carolina couple expecting your first baby, the prospect of a two-day, 1,000-mile road trip to deliver your bundle of joy seems far-fetched.

“Boston is not next door,” concedes Tradd Martin. “But after talking about the pros and cons, it was an easy decision.”

Tradd and his wife Jean decided to deliver their son Alex at Brigham and Women’s Hospital after doctors detected a Vein of Galen malformation, a rare blood vessel abnormality in the brain, during a third-trimester ultrasound.

“I was 32 weeks pregnant, and everything was going great. We even debated not doing the ultrasound, but a little something was telling us, ‘Go ahead,’” recalls Jean.

The ultrasound technician told the Martins she was concerned about an area in Alex’s brain, and the obstetrician diagnosed the couple’s unborn son with a Vein of Galen malformation.

“Our whole world turned upside down,” says Jean. She started researching the condition online to try to find some answers. “There was hardly anything on the Internet, except for Boston Children’s Hospital.”

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Our patients’ stories: Yousef’s Vein of Galen surgery

Yousef-1Yousef Alrkhayes was just two days old when a doctor burst into his mother’s, Khadjad’s, hospital room with unsettling news. “[He] came into my room and said that Yousef has high pressure in his heart and they didn’t know why,” she recalls. After you are discharged, the doctor continued, don’t even go home—go straight to the main hospital.

In the four days it took Khadjah to recover enough to move with her son, Yousef made little progress. His heart was still under stress and no one could say why. As their doctor sent them on their way, he begged them to ask for an echocardiogram at the hospital.

Khadjah could tell from the sound of his voice that he was worried.

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