Stories about: Vascular Anomalies Center

‘Please take good care of our baby sister’: Help for Addison’s hemangioma

When Addison's hemangioma grew too large, surgery was necessary.

Most parents dress their baby girls in headbands for fun. But for Addison Quandt, these accessories, adorned with bows and flowers, weren’t a frivolous fashion statement. Instead, they helped hold in place the gauze that covered a large hemangioma on the back of her neck. “People always said what a fashionable baby she was,” says her mom, Dianne. “If they only knew.”

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Gorham-Stout disease: 12 years, two patients and one innovation

Dan and Alex, a few weeks after Alex's surgery
Dan and Alex, a few weeks after Alex’s surgery for Gorham-Stout disease (Photo Susanne Malloy)

On a snowy Saturday in January, two mothers sat sipping tea and conversing about their sons. It was an ordinary scene, but the women’s conversation was far from ordinary.
The scariest thing a doctor can tell you is ‘I don’t know. I’ve never seen this before.’ To find two doctors who treated this before and then to see Dan doing so well is tremendously gratifying. ~ Susanne Malloy

Susanne’s son Alexander Malloy, 14, had been recently diagnosed with Gorham-Stout disease. Gorham-Stout, also referred to as “vanishing-bone” disease, triggers a process that destroys bones and typically affects a single area like the shoulder, jaw hip, rib or spine.

“It was shocking,” recalls Susanne. An MRI earlier that week, prompted by a worsening of her son’s mild scoliosis, had shown Alex was missing bones in his spine and likely had Gorham-Stout.

After the MRI, Alex’s orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Lawrence Karlin, reassured Susanne and her husband Tom that Boston Children’s Hospital would have a plan for their son.

As Susanne and Tom digested the diagnosis, she began thinking Gorham-Stout, a rare bone disease of the lymphatic system reported in about 300 patients, sounded familiar. “I can’t have heard of it before,” she told herself.

The feeling persisted, so she called a friend, who said, “That sounds like Dan Ventresca.”

Twelve years earlier, Dan, who lived a few streets away from the Malloys in Hingham, Massachusetts, had been diagnosed with the same disease. Like Alex, Dan’s disease was located in his spine. Susanne’s friend called Dan’s mother.

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Marathon parenting

Kristen’s daughter Riley was born with a vascular anomaly called CLOVES Syndrome (Congenital, Lipomatous Overgrowth, Vascular malformations, Epidermal nevi and Scoliosis/Skeletal/Spinal anomalies). Boston Children’s Hospital has done tremendous research on the condition, but due to its rareness Riley’s family often face unique challenges. In the following blog Kristen talks about the day-to-day trials and triumphs involved in raising a medically fragile child.

Riley

Becoming a parent is an act of love and faith that no amount of planning can ever really prepare you for. And once you begin raising your child, the changes you go through as a person are profound. Raising a child with a rare disease is even more life altering.

You experience all the love, hope and joy, but it’s mixed with almost constant anxiety, stress and strained financial budgets. It requires focus, discipline and intense endurance, but it’s also rewarding and empowering. That’s why I call it marathon parenting.

Marathon parenting can be hard to adjust to. (I always saw myself as more of a short-distance walker.) But sometimes life throws you into a race without giving you time to train; you just need to rise to the challenge.

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Living with Sturge-Weber Syndrome: Ryan’s Story

Ryan McIntyre as a newborn. The mark on his forehead, called a port wine stain, was the only outward sign that he might have Sturge-Weber syndrome. (Courtesy of Pam McIntyre)

About one in every 10 babies is born with a birthmark. Most are harmless and don’t require treatment. Some, however, can be signs of a serious problem.

When Ryan McIntyre was born, a dark red birthmark covered his left eyelid and part of his forehead. Within days, Boston Children’s dermatologist and Vascular Anomalies Center member Marilyn Liang, MD, diagnosed the discoloration as a capillary malformation, a common type of birthmark sometimes called a “port wine stain” because of its purplish color.

Liang also suggested that the mark could be a sign of Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS), a rare condition in which extra but abnormal blood vessels grow on the brain’s surface. The unusual blood flow can lead to seizures, developmental delays, glaucoma and weakness or paralysis on one side of the body. While the total number of people born with SWS is not known, estimates range from one in 40,000 to one in 400,000.

An MRI would be needed to confirm the diagnosis, but because Ryan was otherwise healthy and didn’t have any symptoms, his doctors said they could wait until he was six months old before having the scan. Ryan and his family—including his twin sister, Ava—went back to their home in the Boston suburbs.

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