Stories about: type 2 diabetes

Health headlines: Peanut allergies, obesity rehab and diabetes

Child at the DentistOther stories we’ve been reading:

This newborn care program promises to dramatically reduce the number of stillborn births. IVF babies are four times more likely to be stillborn.

Is diabetes to blame for birth defects? [Read Minnie’s story about living with Type 2 diabetes.] Taking antidepressants while pregnant can slow fetal development.

What you eat during pregnancy can impact your baby’s chance of having certain allergies. Can peanut allergies be cured? [Watch Brett’s journey to overcome his milk allergy.] The lactose intolerant population might be smaller than we think.

Poverty in childhood can shape neurobiology. [Read about how more children than ever are relying on food stamps.] Twenty percent of children don’t see a dentist annually. [Did you know that February is Children’s Dental Health Month?]

H1N1 hasn’t peaked yet. [Have your questions answered about whether or not your child should get the H1N1 shot.] A new vaccine has been approved for child infections. [Read about the new immunization schedule.]

Does obesity rehab for kids work? [Read about the First Lady’s obesity initiative.] Physically fit students do better academically. Playing the Wii could help stroke rehabilitation. [What are the effects of “exergames” like the Wii?]

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Health Headlines: Industrial chemicals as dietary supplements, growth hormone therapy and school lunch safety

Other stories we’ve been reading:

Adolescents taking a certain anti-psychotic drugs are at an increased risk for diabetes. An industrial chemical is being sold as a dietary supplement for autism treatment. Diabetes drugs are helping dieting teens lose weight. [Read Minnie’s story about living with Type 2 diabetes.]

Loving foster homes improves children’s attention and impulsivity. Girls with ADHD are more likely to develop other mental health risks.

Obese boys are more likely to begin puberty later in life. A Girl Scouts’ survey found that the fashion industry pressures girls to be thin. [Read about unrealistic media images and how one teen feels about them.] Boys are treated with growth hormone therapy much more often than girls.

Babies of mothers who smoke during pregnancy are much more stressed out. [Read how dangerous secondhand smoke is to children.] Black and Hispanic infants are more likely to have HIV. Expectant mothers can receive pregnancy tips through texting.

Girls who bike to school are in better shape than those who walk or get a ride. The USDA is tightening requirements to assure school lunch safety.[Read about our nation’s fight for kids’ food.]  Overloaded backpacks set your child up for spine strain. [Read about National School Backpack Awareness Day.]

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One patient’s story: my Type 2 diabetes

Mirna “Minnie” Ortiz is a lot like most 16-year-olds. She likes hanging out with her friends, watching television and has dreams for her future. Unlike other teens her age, Minnie is the only person she knows that has Type 2 diabetes. Minnie recently shared her story with PBS in an online video series. Here is Minnie’s introductory video in the series, and below she shares her story about being diagnosed with Type 2 and how it’s changed her life.

Minnie’s story

I was getting really sick towards the end of August 2005. I was throwing up, really thirsty all of the time and felt like I could sleep all day. I was constantly asking for sugary drinks and foods. That’s what my mom would give me. She had no idea at the time that I had diabetes.

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Children's patient featured on PBS series about type 2 diabetes

Minnie Ortiz, a patient of Children’s Hospital Boston’s Optimal Weight for Life Program, is being featured on a new PBS Web video series called Living with My Type 2. Here’s her introductory video, where she talks about not even knowing what type 2 diabetes was before she was diagnosed with it and how, after the death of her mother left her without someone to talk with, she writes in her journal to express the concerns she has about her health.

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