Stories about: summer safety

Protect your kids from dog bites: Tips from the experts

Dog bite prevention
Winston and Cal taking a break from play time. Socializing can help reduce aggression in dogs.

Working in the Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery at Boston Children’s Hospital, Dr. Carolyn Rogers-Vizena treats many young patients with dog bites. “We see everything from small lacerations that can be repaired in the Emergency Department, to bone-crushing facial injuries that require multiple reconstructive operations,” she says.

No matter the severity, dog bites happen every day, and for the most part, they are avoidable. Local veterinarian Dr. Neil Storey teams up with Rogers-Vizena to answer parent’s questions to help their children enjoy man’s best friend in the safest and healthiest ways possible.

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Summer safety tips: The family guide

summer-safety-poolThe warm weather is finally here, which means many kids will be spending more time outside. We’ve assembled our best family safety tips for playgrounds, pools, pets and much more. Be sure to check out the entire guide, and keep it handy.

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Summer first aid tips for parents

Meaghan_OKeeffe_1Meaghan O’Keeffe, RN, BSN, is a mother, writer and nurse. She worked at Boston Children’s Hospital for nearly a decade, in both the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit and the Pre-op Clinic.  She is a regular contributor to Thriving.

Summer provides ample opportunity for enjoying nature, playing outside and gazing at skies full of stars. But some of the side effects of all that outside time—scrapes, stings and other minor injuries—can take some of the fun out of summer. Here’s a quick refresher on some basic first aid every parent should know this time of year.

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Keep kids safe in extreme heat

Flickr/Vectorportal

Temperatures are set to skyrocket all across the East Coast for the next few days. Here are a few tips to make sure you and your family stay safe in the summer’s first heat wave. For more summer safety tips, download Boston Children’s Hospital’s summer safety brochure.

If your children are playing outdoors, make sure they take water breaks, even if they’re not thirsty. If a child complains about any of the following he could be overheated or at risk for heat illness:

  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Muscle cramps

If your child has of any of these symptoms, have him lie down in a cool, shaded area with his feet slightly raised, with drinking water and a cool cloth on hand.

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