Stories about: stem cells

Religion & Ethics – how stem cells fit in

hESCcolony1-0PBS’s show, Religion & Ethics, will be airing an episode beginning Friday, April 2, that focuses on how stem cells fit into religion. The episode features Children’s stem cell researcher George Daley, MD, PhD, and Andres Trevino – who recently shared with Thrive his personal story of how stem cells saved his son’s life.

You can read a recent interview with Daley on the Religion & Ethics Web site and visit Children’s new Web site that aims to demystify stem cell research.

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This week on Thrive: Feb. 22 – 26

Here’s a quick look at what Thrive was up to last week.

The presence of athletic doping in sports is explored. Read Maggie Hickey’s story about how her invisible epidemic was caused by a concussion. Learn all about psychiatric medication and children. Preemies’ pain threshold is lower than previously thought. Claims of vitamin-fortified, sugary foods are hard to swallow. Learn choking prevention tips for your children. Stem cell research opens the window on premature aging. There are DSM changes that can affect your family. What goes on in the brain during a 3-D movie? How having a family changes your views on the environment.

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Stem cells open a window on aging, cancer and a devastating disease

This image shows the green fluorescent signal from telomeres, bits of DNA at the tips of chromosomes (shown in blue). The intensity of the green signal is one indicator of telomere length, which is a measure of cellular "aging" and determines how many times a cell can divide.
This image shows the green fluorescent signal from telomeres, bits of DNA at the tips of chromosomes (shown in blue). The intensity of the green signal is one indicator of telomere length, which is a measure of cellular "aging" and determines how many times a cell can divide.

Stem cell research is in its infancy, but a new study led by Children’s Suneet Agarwal, MD, PhD, and George Q. Daley, MD, PhD, investigators in Children’s Stem Cell Transplantation Program, reveal these cells’ unique powers to teach us about devastating, hard-to-treat diseases – and, in this case, cancer and aging.

In Children with dyskeratosis congenita, a rare condition that leads to premature aging, genetic mutations impair a key enzyme called telomerase that builds up the tips of our chromosomes, known as telomeres. When cells aren’t able to maintain their telomeres, the chromosomes become vulnerable to all kinds of damage, and the cell “ages” more quickly and stops dividing. As a result, children with dyskeratosis congenita have bone marrow failure – they’re unable to make enough blood cells to sustain the body. This requires a bone marrow transplant – an especially punishing procedure for these children, whose other tissues and organs are also failing because of the disease.

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This week on Thrive: Nov. 30 – Dec. 4

Here’s a quick look at what Thrive was up to last week.

Yoga is thought to have many healing powers, but is fighting eating disorders one of them? One patient tells her story of how brain stimulation helps keep her epileptic seizures at bay. Children’s professionalism and ethical practice expert talks about the changing mammography guidelines and gives insight into the health care reform. Children’s Dr. Sharon Levy discusses whether or not home-based drug kits are useful on the MSNBC show “Dr. Nancy.” The National Institute of Health announced 13 new government-approved embryonic stem cell lines, 11 of which were developed at Children’s. The HealthMap team gave us our weekly H1N1 update. Did you know that children with RSV are more likely to be hospitalized than those with seasonal flu? Our Mediatrician sings his praises of Guitar Hero but adds a warning about appropriate lyrics. Good Morning America features Children’s research on autism and facial recognition.

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