Stories about: Sports Medicine Division

What you should know about hip labral tears in young athletes

Dr. Young-Jo Kim hip labral tears Q&A lead image

Labral tears are a common injury in the hip, particularly with young athletes who may have underlying hip anatomy issues, such as hip dysplasia or impingement. Treatment for labral tears can range from rest and physical therapy to open surgery, with time away from sports spanning from days to weeks, or even months.

It’s important that any individual experiencing hip pain see a physician as soon as possible in order to limit pain and damage to the hip. Dr. Young-Jo Kim, a pediatric and young adult orthopedic hip specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center, discusses the causes of labral tears and his philosophy for treatment of this injury in young athletes.

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How to prevent ACL injuries in female athletes

ACL injury prevention female athletes

An ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) tear is a devastating injury that can end an athlete’s season and sometimes take up to a year to fully recover. Along with the pain and long rehab process, it also carries the consequences of a high rate of re-tear and increased risk for osteoarthritis. But what if you could decrease your risk of getting this injury, just by doing certain exercises for 20 minutes two times per week?

Dr. Dai Sugimoto, director of clinical research at The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention at Boston Children’s Hospital, has focused his research on training regimens that help prevent ACL injuries. Through extensive study, Sugimoto has found specific exercises that have been shown to decrease the rate of ACL injuries for female athletes.

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What you should know about knee instability and dislocations in young athletes

lead image Milewski patellofemoral instability

Pain in the kneecap (patella) is very common in young athletes. It’s estimated that up to 15% of adolescents get some degree of patellofemoral pain. Most can be treated with rest, ice, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and sometimes rehab exercises. But instability of the patella — known as patellofemoral instability — is relatively less common, and more worrisome for children and adolescents.

The term “patellofemoral instability” can refer to either a traumatic injury in which a person dislocates their patella, or just general instability in the knee that a person may feel or a physician may observe upon examination. In both cases, it’s important the individual receives the proper treatment in order to avoid long-term damage.

Thriving talked to Dr. Matthew Milewski, a pediatric orthopedic sports medicine surgeon in Boston Children’s Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Center, about what kids and parents should be aware of if they experience this knee condition.

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Julia Marino’s Olympic story: Achieving after injury

Julia Marino lead image Thriving

Julia Marino is always thinking about her story, and it would be hard not too, given how much of an adventure her life has been so far. “Being adopted out of Paraguay to have a normal life in America would’ve been enough of a story itself,” she says. “But I’ve had the chance to live a life beyond what anybody could even dream of.”

As an Olympic skier, Julia has been competing at the top of her sport for almost a decade. In 2014, she reached the pinnacle of snow sports at the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. But how she got there – and where she plans on going now – was heavily influenced by a devastating knee injury just a few years before the Olympics.

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