Stories about: sports injuries

Our patients' stories: Tackling concussion head-on

On September 12, at 6 p.m. Mark Proctor, MD, director of Children’s Brain Injury Center, will lead a dynamic discussion on concussions in pediatric patients during a live, interactive Webcast. A multidisciplinary team from Children’s Hospital Boston departments of Neurology, Neurosurgery, Neuropsychology, Neuroradiology and Sports Medicine, will join Proctor. Sign up for an email reminder about the webcast and read on to learn more about the patient featured in the presentation.

Even at just 7-years-old, Nicklas Johnson seemed more comfortable on skates than he did walking. A natural born athlete, Nick split his time between the hockey rink, soccer and lacrosse fields, but it was clear that the ice was his true passion. But in 2006 Nick sustained a hockey injury that would force him to reevaluate not only his love for the sport, but his future as well.

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Too much too soon: the new and dangerous culture of youth sports

My friend Nancy went for physical therapy for her back pain the other day, and was really surprised by what she saw there: the place was full of kids.

“Yeah, it’s like this now,” said the therapist when Nancy asked about it. “It’s the sports.”

It’s not that kids are getting clumsier or having more accidents. The injuries that are sending kids to physical therapy are overuse injuries. Kids these days are specializing in a sport as early as elementary school, and spending many more hours a week in practice than we ever did as kids—and we’re seeing the consequences.

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Health headlines: Sports injuries, lazy ear and lice

Sports injuryOther stories we’ve been reading:

Be sure to keep liquid detergent capsules out of your kids’ reach. Scientists find out why Vitamin D is important. [Read how children are at risk of a Vitamin D deficiency.]There’s a jump in kids’ sports injuries due to overuse. [Read about how girls’ soccer injuries are preventable.]

Twenty percent of U.S. babies don’t get the hepatitis B vaccine. A Canadian vaccine study proves the idea of “herd community.” [Read about this year’s vaccine schedule.] A new drug could help protect against treatment-resistant lice.

Parents can help prevent bullying by modeling kindness and empathy. [Find out how to address bullying.] Girls start bullying at a younger age.

Special needs kids are often uninsured. Can a behavioral optometrist help kids with “issues?”

A consumer groups gives food advertisers an “F” on kids. Taxing soda and pizza could help consumers lose five pounds a year. Schools are serving less sugary drinks. [Read about artificially sweetened beverages.]

A stomach bug can raise a child’s risk of having irritable bowel syndrome. Temporary hearing impairment leads to lazy ear.

Peanut allergies are linked to worse asthma in kids. A family finds success using a pediatric obesity program.

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