Stories about: smoking

Ask the Mediatrician: Should kids watch movies with smoking scenes?

Ask the Mediatrician: Smoking in Films
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: PATRICK BIBBINS/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

I’ve seen news stories about the dangers of kids seeing smoking in movies. I’m a bit confused, as I no longer thought smoking was really an issue, especially in kids’ movies (G, PG, PG-13) and that smoking in general, is on the decline. Is this something I should still be concerned about when I take my 10-year-old to the movies?

~Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, Boston, MA

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Pink cigarette ads target teenage girls

Camel No. 9by Dafna Lemish, PhD

The “pinkification” of girls’ culture – their clothes, toys and accessories – is a booming and relatively recent marketing strategy, marking girls as “cute” and thus very different than boys, who are “tough.” Walk into any clothing or toy store or go online and try to buy something for your daughter that’s not pink. Check your favorite online shopping sites.

But pink has recently shown up in a more insidious and dangerous place: cigarette packaging. The “pink campaign” by Camel cigarettes was introduced in 2007 to appeal directly to pre-teen girls by exploiting a color associated with this age and gender group.

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Fire safety for your family

Lois Lee, MD, MPH
Lois Lee, MD, MPH

Lois Lee, MD, MPH works in Children’s Emergency Department Injury Prevention Program

The city of Boston recently celebrated the fact that no citizens within the city died as a result of a house fire in 2009—the first year with no deaths since 1972, when the Fire Department started keeping records about fire-related deaths. It seems to me in 2010 that deaths from house fires should be a phenomenon of an earlier century, but sadly this is not true.

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Health Headlines: Industrial chemicals as dietary supplements, growth hormone therapy and school lunch safety

Other stories we’ve been reading:

Adolescents taking a certain anti-psychotic drugs are at an increased risk for diabetes. An industrial chemical is being sold as a dietary supplement for autism treatment. Diabetes drugs are helping dieting teens lose weight. [Read Minnie’s story about living with Type 2 diabetes.]

Loving foster homes improves children’s attention and impulsivity. Girls with ADHD are more likely to develop other mental health risks.

Obese boys are more likely to begin puberty later in life. A Girl Scouts’ survey found that the fashion industry pressures girls to be thin. [Read about unrealistic media images and how one teen feels about them.] Boys are treated with growth hormone therapy much more often than girls.

Babies of mothers who smoke during pregnancy are much more stressed out. [Read how dangerous secondhand smoke is to children.] Black and Hispanic infants are more likely to have HIV. Expectant mothers can receive pregnancy tips through texting.

Girls who bike to school are in better shape than those who walk or get a ride. The USDA is tightening requirements to assure school lunch safety.[Read about our nation’s fight for kids’ food.]  Overloaded backpacks set your child up for spine strain. [Read about National School Backpack Awareness Day.]

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