Stories about: short bowel syndrome (SBS).

Saving six: Life before and after transplant

An organ transplant is a life-changing event extending far beyond the operating room, the clinics and the hospital walls. Read about five children, one young adult and their families, whose lives were forever changed by the Pediatric Transplant Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.


Lydia’s liver transplant, a mom’s gift

Living donor liver transplant recipientDawn Cavanagh gave her daughter life twice — first when she was born and, again, when she gave 13-year-old Lydia a piece of her liver last summer. The donor-approval process, which occurs with Boston Children’s partner Lahey Hospital & Medical Center, required hours of medical screening, including an interview with a social worker, who asked if Dawn expected anything in return for being Lydia’s liver donor. “And I said, ‘Of course I expect something,’” explains Dawn. “’I expect her to live a long and happy life, and I expect her to be with me for a long time.’”

More than a year after her liver transplant, for Lydia’s birthday, Aug. 1, the Cavanagh family went on Lydia’s Make-A-Wish trip, a Disney cruise to the Bahamas. “We had so much fun,” says Dawn. “She’s a happy kid. She has dreams. She wants to be a transplant nurse, and she wants to work on 10 South at Boston Children’s Hospital.” 

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Our patients' stories: From Russia with love

Because of the severity of her condition, Evelina had to be transported to Children's for treatment

When Victor Beletsky’s daughter was born in his native Moscow, he and his wife couldn’t have been happier. But shortly after Evelina’s birth doctors noticed she was having trouble eating and their joy quickly turned to panic. Evelina was born with a gastrointestinal tract disorder that led to her losing a significant portion of it, resulting in short bowel syndrome (SBS). SBS refers to any condition where a large portion of the small bowel is either missing (due to surgery or a variety of genetic and acquired disorders) or isn’t working properly for some other reason. With SBS, the body cannot adequately digest or absorb sugars, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals. Russian doctors quickly tried to rectify baby Evelina’s condition, and performed two emergency operations that removed almost 90 percent of her intestine.

Read Full Story | 5 Comments | Leave a Comment