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Our patients’ stories: understanding (and beating) eosinophilic esophagitis

As an infant, Cameron Newbold hated eating. That’s not to say he was a finicky eater like some babies; he actually dreaded feeding times.

“Anytime we tried to feed him he’d freeze up, stiff as a board,” remembers his mother Kristina. “It was like he knew the food was making him sick. It was terrible.”

During feedings, Cameron cried, squirmed and would never eat more than a few ounces at a time. At 5 weeks old, he was hospitalized because he stopped eating, but a conclusive diagnosis couldn’t be found. The Newbolds left their local hospital with medication for reflux, a child who was still sick and few answers.

Over the next few years, Cameron was tested for dairy aversion and various food allergies, but most of the testing was inconclusive. He lived almost exclusively off soy yogurt (Kristina believes the cool, smooth food was soothing to him) and often felt too sick to play with other children, which affected how he related to his peers.

“Looking back now, it’s clear that Cameron felt sick just about all the time when he was younger,” Kristina says. “But because that’s all he had ever known, he didn’t really know how to express his discomfort, or when he felt worse than usual. As far as he knew, constantly feeling awful was what life was.”

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