Stories about: parenting

The Nurse’s Throw-Up Guide

Meaghan O’Keeffe, RN, BSN, is a mother, writer and nurse. She worked at Boston Children’s Hospital for nearly a decade, in both the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit and the Pre-op Clinic.  She is a regular contributor to Thriving.

Meaghan_OKeeffe_1When it comes to common childhood illnesses, few wreak havoc on the entire household like the dreaded stomach bug (or viral gastroenteritis).

No parent likes it. Most siblings can’t take even the slightest thought of it. And often, the last person to get sick is the poor caretaker.

But there’s some hope. With these nurse-approved throw-up tips, you might get through this unscathed. Even if you don’t, it can be less disastrous than you might have initially imagined.

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When your child is the patient: A nurse’s perspective

Meaghan O’Keeffe, RN, BSN, is a mother, writer and nurse. She worked at Boston Children’s Hospital for nearly a decade, in both the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit and the Pre-op Clinic.  She is a regular contributor to Thriving.

Meaghan_OKeeffe_1I have always prided my nursing style as being deeply rooted in compassion. I put myself in the shoes of the families that walk through the rotating doors of Boston Children’s Hospital and acted accordingly as their nurse.

But now, after a brief health scare with my oldest child, I better understand that truly identifying with the parents of sick children is much harder than I thought. It’s difficult to really appreciate how crushing it can feel.

I think I get it now. At least a little more than I did before. And while my Sophie’s recent health issue was only a brief scare that eventually turned out fine, the whole experience gave me a better understanding of what “worried sick” truly means.

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Summer first aid tips for parents

Meaghan_OKeeffe_1Meaghan O’Keeffe, RN, BSN, is a mother, writer and nurse. She worked at Boston Children’s Hospital for nearly a decade, in both the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit and the Pre-op Clinic.  She is a regular contributor to Thriving.

Summer provides ample opportunity for enjoying nature, playing outside and gazing at skies full of stars. But some of the side effects of all that outside time—scrapes, stings and other minor injuries—can take some of the fun out of summer. Here’s a quick refresher on some basic first aid every parent should know this time of year.

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Helping your child through a transition

Meaghan O’Keeffe, RN, BSN, is a mother, writer and nurse. She worked at Boston Children’s Hospital for nearly a decade, in both the Cardiac Intensive Care Unit and the Pre-op Clinic.  She is a regular contributor to Thriving.

Meaghan_OKeeffe_1A few months ago I hit a parenting rut. It was the end of February. Between the holidays, the snow days, and some sick days, we hadn’t had a solid three-day week of pre-school in almost two months. My four-year-old son, Tommy, began to have extreme meltdowns several times a day. Because it was time to leave the house. Or it was time to put a toy down. Or it was time for bed. (Or, as it seemed to me, just because.) Each moment was an intense battle and no matter what I tried, I couldn’t navigate around the rough waters. I kept hitting the rapids. I was at my wit’s end. Enough that I pulled his pre-school teacher aside one morning, and whispered, near tears, “I don’t know what to do with him.” She reassured me this was normal and gave me some tips. I made a few changes, and within a couple of weeks, it appeared we had emerged from the whirlpool.

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