Stories about: neonatal and congenital anomaly neurosurgery

Pushing past the pain: Morgan’s journey with spina bifida

Dr. Warf with Morgan, who has spina bifida.
“Be glad you can use your legs now. You might not always be able to.”

That’s what Morgan Gautreau was told by a neurosurgeon in Alabama six years ago, one of many doctors she had seen seeking a solution for her nearly constant back pain caused by a tethered spinal cord, a condition where the spinal cord is attached to tissue around the spine and can’t move freely within the spinal canal. Morgan’s tethered cord was due to spina bifida occulta, a type of neural tube defect where the spinal column doesn’t develop properly.

Luckily, she and her family didn’t take his words to heart, but kept looking for help.

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Coming together from worlds apart for spina bifida care

Molly Gotbeter giggles impishly as she accepts a sugar cookie and frosting from a nurse. She’s sitting patiently on an exam table waiting to see one of her favorite people in the world — Benjamin Warf, MD, director of Neonatal and Congenital Anomaly Neurosurgery at Boston Children’s Hospital.

For this visit to the spina bifida clinic, Molly has traveled from her home in Charleston, South Carolina. But her journey to Dr. Warf and Boston Children’s has been much longer.

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