Stories about: ludwig

Boston launches Soda-Free Summer Challenge

Soda from a marketing perspective: “It’s bubbly, sweet and drinking it makes your life like a non-stop party!” The reality of excessive soda consumption: sugar-heavy sodas have been linked to America’s growing rates of obesity, diabetes, tooth decay, heart disease and depression.

In an effort to put a cap on young Bostonians’ soda drinking, the city is initiating the Soda-Free Summer Challenge, where participants pledge to abstain from drinking soda all summer.

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How healthy is your breakfast?

chocolate coated cerealWill a highly processed, sugary breakfast cereal help your kids avoid getting sick this winter? That’s the implied claim on packages of Kellogg’s Cocoa Krispies.

What they don’t advertise is that some version of sugar or partially hydrogenated fat (that is, trans fat) appears four times on the ingredient list.

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Obesity rates leveling off for the nation’s children?

ludwig
David Ludwig, MD, PhD

Since 1980, national childhood obesity rates have more than tripled. But a new study, released last week, suggests that the percentage of obese children may have reached a plateau. In Massachusetts, the percentage of obese children has remained stable—at 30 percent—since 2003. Nationally, the percentage of obese or overweight children is at or above 30 percent in 30 states.

The report, released by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, includes a clever map that charts the percentage of overweight and obese children and adults in all 50 states. Despite this leveling off,  David Ludwig, MD, PhD, director of Children’s Hospital Boston’s Obesity Program, thinks the nation’s obesity problem is far from solved. Here, he weighs in with the Boston Globe about the unacceptably high rate of childhood obesity.

Among the figures:

  • Out of the 10 states with the highest rate of obese and overweight children, eight are in the South
  • Mississippi has the highest level of obese and overweight children, at 44.4 percent.
  • Minnesota and Utah are tied for the lowest rate of obese and overweight children
  • No states saw a decrease in adult obesity

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Our nation’s obesity epidemic

ludwig
David Ludwig, MD, PhD

Since 1980, national childhood obesity rates have more than tripled. But a new study, released last week, suggests that the percentage of obese children may have reached a plateau. In Massachusetts, the percentage of obese children has remained stable—at 30 percent—since 2003. Nationally, the percentage of obese or overweight children is at or above 30 percent in 30 states.

The report, released by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, includes a clever map that charts the percentage of overweight and obese children and adults in all 50 states. Despite this leveling off,  David Ludwig, MD, PhD, director of Children’s Hospital Boston’s Obesity Program, thinks the nation’s obesity problem is far from solved. Here, he weighs in with the Boston Globe about the unacceptably high rate of childhood obesity.

Among the figures:

  • Out of the 10 states with the highest rate of obese and overweight children, eight are in the South
  • Mississippi has the highest level of obese and overweight children, at 44.4 percent.
  • Minnesota and Utah are tied for the lowest rate of obese and overweight children
  • No states saw a decrease in adult obesity

Read Full Story