Stories about: lice

Don’t pull your hair out over head lice

So-called “super-lice” are big news now, just in time for children to go back to school. While that news may be somewhat overblown, as any parent who has been through one will tell you, a lice infestation can be a time-consuming and worrisome health issue. One of the bigger concerns for parents is that if their child is diagnosed with lice, they will have to stay home from school or daycare, something that recent guidelines have stated is NOT the case.

Here are six important facts about lice to keep in mind:

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Anyone can get lice.

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Lice are not related to cleanliness. Anyone can get lice if they are in prolonged, close contact with someone else with lice. Lice only infect people—not pets—and cannot hop or fly. They spread by crawling from one scalp to another scalp. It is very uncommon to get lice from hats or brushes or combs since they cannot survive off the scalp for more than 24 hours.

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Health headlines: Sports injuries, lazy ear and lice

Sports injuryOther stories we’ve been reading:

Be sure to keep liquid detergent capsules out of your kids’ reach. Scientists find out why Vitamin D is important. [Read how children are at risk of a Vitamin D deficiency.]There’s a jump in kids’ sports injuries due to overuse. [Read about how girls’ soccer injuries are preventable.]

Twenty percent of U.S. babies don’t get the hepatitis B vaccine. A Canadian vaccine study proves the idea of “herd community.” [Read about this year’s vaccine schedule.] A new drug could help protect against treatment-resistant lice.

Parents can help prevent bullying by modeling kindness and empathy. [Find out how to address bullying.] Girls start bullying at a younger age.

Special needs kids are often uninsured. Can a behavioral optometrist help kids with “issues?”

A consumer groups gives food advertisers an “F” on kids. Taxing soda and pizza could help consumers lose five pounds a year. Schools are serving less sugary drinks. [Read about artificially sweetened beverages.]

A stomach bug can raise a child’s risk of having irritable bowel syndrome. Temporary hearing impairment leads to lazy ear.

Peanut allergies are linked to worse asthma in kids. A family finds success using a pediatric obesity program.

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