Stories about: injury

This week on Thrive: Nov. 9 – 13

Here’s a quick look at what Thrive was up to last week.

An eco-perspective is explored on H1N1. Survivors of childhood brain cancer face a variety of late effects and why you need to get rid of your old glass thermometers. Children’s explores how babies understand expressions and emotions and offers tips on how to prepare your child for a flu vaccine. A new study reveals that parents are out of touch about knowing their kids’ stress levels and a Children’s expert gives tip on how to help kids cope with the stress of having a parent at war. The HealthMap team gives us our weekly H1N1 update and your questions are answered about whether or not your asthmatic child should get the H1N1 vaccine. Children are increasingly relying on food stamps and the Mediatrician dishes on telenovelas and toddlers.

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This week on Thrive: Nov. 2 – 6

Here’s a quick look at what Thrive was up to last week.

Read why the days of jumping back into a game after a possible concussion are over. A new study shows that adult survivors of childhood cancer are much more likely to experience suicidal thoughts than their peers. Children’s expert Ellen Hanson, PhD, questions whether autism really is on the rise. An experimental heart valve saves a child with H1N1. Children’s has established and unprecedented partnership with the state’s largest health plans. The HealthMap team gives its weekly H1N1 update. Children’s Dennis Rosen, MD, questions whether sleeping late can keep your child slim and Joanne Cox, MD, answers parents’ questions about H1N1. Our resident mediatrician tackles the question of graphic violent and sexual images in the media and a teen guest blogger writes about teens and self-esteem.

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This week on Thrive: Oct. 5 – 9

Here’s a quick look at what Thrive was up to last week.

Canada is delaying its seasonal-flu vaccine program. Should we be worried? There are an alarmingly high number of glass-table injuries involving children. Six months after Children’s Hospital Boston’s Division of Emergency Medicine published a study on these injuries, new standards have been recommended in the production of glass-tables. A Children’s study showed that side effects or accidental overdoses of medications in children are more common than you might think. In part 7 of our milk allergy series, Robyn Nasuti shares her tips on keeping her kitchen safe. French Parliament wants to pass a law that would mandate a bold print notice when images have been digitally enhanced. Children’s Alison Field, ScD, who specializes in eating disorders, talks about what we can do to educate our children about images in the media. We follow one family’s story when they discovered their child, Ann Louise, showed signs of a congenital heart defect. Children’s David Ludwig, MD, addresses the soda-tax solution in an opinion piece for the Los Angeles Times. The HealthMap team gives their weekly H1N1 update. The Mediatrician weighs in on what computer games, if any, are good for a 2-year-old.

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Health headlines: Premature babies, burn injuries and cherry flavored Tamiflu

Other stories we’ve been reading:

  • Nearly one in 10 of the world’s babies is born prematurely, and about 1 million infants die each year as a result, says a startling report.
  • Ear infections are especially common in children between 6 months and 3-years old. The Canadian Pediatric Society’s website, Caring for Kids, offers us some great information on how to know when your child has an ear infection and what to do when it actually happens.
  • Burn injuries among children dropped by 31 percent between 1990 and 2006. Even though the numbers are down, burn injuries are still disproportionately high among younger children.
  • Kitchens are a great place for families to gather. They are also a hotspot for injuries. Vicky McEvoy, M.D., an assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School tells us about common kitchen injuries that you should be aware of.
  • The liquid children’s version of the anti-influenza drug Tamiflu in short supply, so pharmacists are making their own children’s version by mixing cherry syrup with the contents of the Tamiflu capsules.
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