Stories about: IBD

“I’m the face behind the phone.”

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(Katherine C. Cohen/Boston Children’s Hospital)

 

Nikiay Kelly

Gastroenterology Scheduler, Care Team Member

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I answer frequently-asked questions using the live Web-chat feature, and I answer questions and schedule appointments by phone. I enjoy helping patients, especially when I see the impact on patient care.

I recently received a call from a new patient who wanted to see a doctor immediately. He was experiencing some stomach upset and was questioning whether he had IBD (inflammatory bowel disease.)

I was able to contact a doctor and quickly coordinate a consultation for a time that worked best for the patient. I felt really good at the end of the call because I got him the appointment and the care he needed.

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care-team-logoCaring for patients is a true team effort. Care Team highlights the dedication of the people throughout Boston Children’s who do their part to comfort and support patient families each and every day.

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Faces of IBD: Every journey is unique

Hover over the photos to read about Boston Children’s IBD patients and the care they receive.

Boston Children’s Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center treats over 1,500 children, adolescents and young adults managing IBD each year. Whether patients are traveling across the globe for very early onset IBD care, balancing diet and medication at home, school or abroad or living a life free of Crohn’s or colitis after surgery, the caregivers at the Boston Children’s Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center understand the challenges patients and families face and support them every step of the way. In honor of National Crohn’s & Colitis Awareness Week (Dec. 1-7), we are celebrating our IBD patients and the team of physicians, nurses, dietitians and social workers who supported them through their journey.

Learn more about the Boston Children’s Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center.

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August highlights: Overcoming diabetes, asthma and more

Catch up on what you may have missed on Thriving last month. Our staff takes a look back at a few of this month’s favorite posts.

How to survive six months in the wilderness with type 1 diabetes

Hiking in Vermont

Rachel Hemond, an 18-year-old who has type 1 diabetes, doesn’t need much direction when it comes to survival. This winter, Rachel completed a 600-mile circumnavigation of Vermont by backcountry ski, white water canoe, rowboat and bicycle—and kept her diabetes under control.

Read more about how Rachel manages her diabetes.

Overcoming IBD obstacles…and traveling the world

Megan was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis on December 23, 2009—her life changed forever. She went from a healthy and active 14-year-old to a teen with some very concerning symptoms. A few years later, a decision to have surgery changed her life and allowed her to travel the globe.

Experience Megan’s journeys.

“When you hit rock bottom…the only way to go is up.”

Justin at his first 5K in 2014 and his second in 2015 after nine months of rehabilitation
Justin at his first 5K in 2014 and his second in 2015 after nine months of rehabilitation

The Franciscan Hospital for Children Heartbreak Hill 5K on June 14, 2014, was a special day for Justin Ith. It was the first time the 16-year-old, who weighed a mere 70 pounds at the time, had been outside for months. As a nurse pushed the wheelchair-bound teen across the finish line, he turned to her and vowed, “Next year, I’m going to finish this race by myself.”

Learn about Justin’s triumph.

Getting in the ring with asthma

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10-year-old Joel was diagnosed with asthma at age 2, which was difficult news for his mother Ellis. At age 6, a severe asthma attack landed Joel at Boston Children’s Hospital Department of Emergency Medicine with the risk of a collapsed lung. After spending two weeks in the hospital, Joel was released home and referred to Boston Children’s Community Asthma Initiative (CAI)—a free program that helps Boston-area families manage their child’s asthma at home.

Find out how Joel and Ellis keep his asthma under control.

5 things to know about teens and depression
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Depression impacts many youth and families across the U.S. Up to 28% of young people experience an episode of major depression by age 19 with an average onset age of 13 years old. However, only 38% of teens experiencing depression receive treatment. Raising awareness is a key step to addressing depression.

Learn how you can help teens with depression.

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Overcoming IBD obstacles…and traveling the world

 

 

 

 

I was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis on December 23, 2009—a day my life changed forever. I went from a healthy and active 14-year-old to a teen with some very concerning symptoms: frequent and sudden onsets of stomach pain, exhaustion and the constant urge to use the bathroom. The diagnosis of a blistered, swollen, large intestine was both a relief and an added stressor.

But my diagnosis was just the beginning of my journey.

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