Stories about: hip dysplasia

Catching up with Hunter: On the fast track

ACE Kids
Hunter, Congressman Poliquin and Madison

A few months ago, Hunter VanBrocklin was barely managing a 1 mile-per-hour pace on the treadmill. That was before his surgery to treat hip dysplasia.

His surgeon, Dr. Benjamin Shore of the Boston Children’s Hospital Orthopedic Center, cautioned Hunter that it could take as long as one year to recover his pre-surgery pace.

“I went past 1 mph already. Say good-bye,” brags Hunter, who’s not only managing a brisk 3 miles-per-hour pace, but also recently returned from a trip to Washington D.C. for Family Advocacy Day. The annual event brings families from children’s hospitals across the U.S. to the capital to meet with their senators and representatives to share their medical stories and encourage lawmakers to improve access to high-quality pediatric care.

This year, Boston Children’s staff and families sought to secure sponsorship for the Advancing Care for Exceptional (ACE) Kids Act of 2015, a bill that makes it easier for children with medically complex conditions who rely on Medicaid to get the care they need at children’s hospitals, especially when they have to cross state lines.

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Cerebral palsy can’t slow this coxswain

cerebral palsyFor the women’s crew team at College of the Holy Cross and rowers everywhere, all eyes are on the Head of the Charles Regatta. It’s a long journey for every rower participating in the sport’s ultimate competition. But few have come so far as Caroline Laurendeau, the 4’11” coxswain for the Holy Cross Crusaders women’s rowing team.

Caroline, who was born weighing just 1 lb. 11 oz., spent the first four-and-a-half months of her life in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) at Boston Children’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Those first few months were hectic and scary for Caroline’s family. At one point, she suffered a pericardial effusion — fluid had accumulated around her heart. “The mortality rate from that can be really high,” explains Dr. Jane Stewart, director of the Boston Children’s Infant Follow-up Program. Physicians at Boston Children’s tapped the effusion to release the fluid and save her life.

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Two hip dysplasia surgeries feed Anna’s interest in medicine

Anna_BradshawBoston Children’s Hospital strives to create a comfortable, supportive environment for all of its patients. Still, most can’t wait to leave the sterile hospital halls and return to the comfort of their own homes. Anna, a 20-year-old college student from N.H., has other thoughts.

“I can’t wait to come back to Boston Children’s.”

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Buddy system benefits athletes with hip dysplasia

college soccer player kristina who had hip dysplasia The buddy system is great. It helps keep buddies safe, secure and confident. When you’re a college athlete facing two major surgeries (called periacetabular osteotomy or PAO) to correct hip dysplasia in one year, a buddy can be a lifeline.

Until she was 18, Kristina Simonson had been one of those lucky athletes who escaped injury season after season. The Babson College student started playing soccer at 5 and entered college as a two-sport athlete—soccer and lacrosse.

She began experiencing hip pain her freshman year in college. Her trainer suspected it might be a torn labrum, or a rip in the seal that normally cushions the hip joint. He was right … but only partially.

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