Stories about: hip dysplasia

Printing a plan to resolve an athlete’s pain

Louise before hip surgery
Photo credit: Risley Sports Photography LLC

Just days away from a complex hip surgery, Louise Atadja smiles and laughs. “I’m not really nervous at all. I feel like it’s the next thing on my to-do list, like we’re just checking off a box,” she says. “That’s the type of person I am — I make lists of what I have to do, so that’s how I’m thinking about it.”

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ABCs of DDH: What moms and dads need to know

Baby with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is seen at Boston Children's Hospital.A family’s journey with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) typically starts when a baby’s pediatrician hears a click in her hips. The next steps often include an ultrasound and a follow-up with an orthopedic surgeon, perhaps a pediatric hip specialist.

College friends Tosha LoSurdo and Jessica Rohrick recently re-connected after their babies were both diagnosed with and treated for DDH at the Boston Children’s Hospital Child and Young Adult Hip Preservation Program.

Tosha’s daughter, Carmela, and Jessica’s daughter, Phallon, were treated with a Pavlik harness and are on a regular follow-up schedule with their pediatric orthopedic surgeons — Drs. Eduardo Novais and Travis Matheney.

The new parents offer advice for other parents whose babies are diagnosed with DDH.

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Catching up with Hunter: On the fast track

ACE Kids
Hunter, Congressman Poliquin and Madison

A few months ago, Hunter VanBrocklin was barely managing a 1 mile-per-hour pace on the treadmill. That was before his surgery to treat hip dysplasia.

His surgeon, Dr. Benjamin Shore of the Boston Children’s Hospital Orthopedic Center, cautioned Hunter that it could take as long as one year to recover his pre-surgery pace.

“I went past 1 mph already. Say good-bye,” brags Hunter, who’s not only managing a brisk 3 miles-per-hour pace, but also recently returned from a trip to Washington D.C. for Family Advocacy Day. The annual event brings families from children’s hospitals across the U.S. to the capital to meet with their senators and representatives to share their medical stories and encourage lawmakers to improve access to high-quality pediatric care.

This year, Boston Children’s staff and families sought to secure sponsorship for the Advancing Care for Exceptional (ACE) Kids Act of 2015, a bill that makes it easier for children with medically complex conditions who rely on Medicaid to get the care they need at children’s hospitals, especially when they have to cross state lines.

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Cerebral palsy can’t slow this coxswain

cerebral palsyFor the women’s crew team at College of the Holy Cross and rowers everywhere, all eyes are on the Head of the Charles Regatta. It’s a long journey for every rower participating in the sport’s ultimate competition. But few have come so far as Caroline Laurendeau, the 4’11” coxswain for the Holy Cross Crusaders women’s rowing team.

Caroline, who was born weighing just 1 lb. 11 oz., spent the first four-and-a-half months of her life in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) at Boston Children’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Those first few months were hectic and scary for Caroline’s family. At one point, she suffered a pericardial effusion — fluid had accumulated around her heart. “The mortality rate from that can be really high,” explains Dr. Jane Stewart, director of the Boston Children’s Infant Follow-up Program. Physicians at Boston Children’s tapped the effusion to release the fluid and save her life.

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