Stories about: G-tube

Taking a leap of faith: Jack says goodbye to his G-tube

Jack colors in a coloring book before having his G-tube removed
PHOTOS: SOPHIE FABBRI/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

As they waited for their son Jack’s appointment, Marika and Josh Reuling had no indication that July 17, 2018, would be different from any other day. They chatted, glanced at the cartoons playing in the waiting room and handed Jack crayon after crayon as he happily colored a picture. It seemed like a just another routine check-up with Dr. Rachel Rosen, director of the Aerodigestive Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.

But once the Reulings were settled in an exam room and Jack had sampled a variety of foods as part of an evaluation with feeding specialist Kara Larson, Rosen had a surprise for them. “What do you think about taking out Jack’s G-tube today?” she asked.

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Reena’s story: A bright future with short bowel syndrome

Reena doesn't let short bowel syndrome define her.

She’s just 16, but Reena Zuckerman knows exactly what she wants to be doing in another 10 years. “My dream is to play on the press team in the annual Women’s Congressional Softball Game,” says the aspiring political journalist. Since 2009, the event has pitted members of Congress against the press corps, raising nearly a million dollars for charity. “When I’m not doing schoolwork or watching TV, I’m listening to political podcasts and NPR,” Reena confesses.

It’s an impressive goal, but one that’s no doubt attainable for this driven teen, who’s been pushing herself to defy expectations since she was a baby. Her accomplishments are all the more remarkable considering that she was born with a serious gastrointestinal condition.

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‘An easy decision’: Finding care for short bowel syndrome

care for short bowel syndrome

Allie DeRienzo loves to dance, sing and play with her big brother, switching from the pink-and-purple cartoon world of Shimmer and Shine to the action-packed fantasy of Star Wars with the blink of an eye. It’s a flexibility that has served her well: In just a few years, she’s endured more ups and downs than most 3-year-olds.

Although her pregnancy was normal, it became clear as soon as Allie was born that something wasn’t right. “She was incredibly distended and was transferred almost immediately to a high-level neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in New York,” remembers her mother, Nanci.

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Parent Q&A: Tips for feeding tube management

2015-11-18_14.13.20Meet 13-month-old Evie and her parents, Amy and Erick Moy. Evie was diagnosed prenatally with Down Syndrome and spent the first six weeks of her young life in the neonatal intensive care unit. During that time, doctors identified a second condition: she was born with three holes in her heart.

In order to undergo the open-heart surgery required to correct the heart defect, Evie needed nutritional assistance — extra fluids and calories delivered via a feeding tube to build up the strength prior to surgery.

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