Stories about: esotropia

Ask the expert: What is the best way to correct my child’s crossed eye?

Image of Dr. David Hunter, an expert at using Botox to correct crossed eyes
Dr. David Hunter is experienced in using traditional strabismus surgery and Botox injection to correct a child’s crossed eye.

If you see that your child’s eye has become crossed, or he or she complains of having double vision, you may be struggling to find clear answers about what caused this to happen and the best way to get your child’s eyes working together again.

When the sudden onset of an inward-turning crossed eye doesn’t respond to glasses and isn’t associated with other systemic or structural disease, it’s known as acute comitant esotropia. This condition is quite rare and usually requires prompt surgical intervention.

Strabismus: Misaligned eye(s)
Esotropia: Inward-turning (“crossed”) eye(s)
Comitant: Eye misalignment stays the same throughout full range of gaze

Until recently, the only treatment for acute comitant esotropia has been traditional strabismus (misaligned eye) surgery.

But more recently, injection of medical-grade botulinum toxin (Botox) has been used to correct esotropia.

So, how do you know if Botox injection is appropriate for correcting your child’s esotropia? Dr. David Hunter, Ophthalmologist-in-Chief at Boston Children’s Hospital, answers questions about the differences between strabismus surgery and Botox injection.

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