Stories about: Emily Davidson

A diagnosis of Down syndrome motivates a family to go the extra mile

Mae, who has Down syndrome, sits on the bottom of a slide. As she leaves nursery school at the end of each day, Mae Tapley blows kisses to every person she passes on her way to the door. For her mother, Susie, watching teachers and staff step out into the hall to wave to her daughter is a welcome change. Three years ago, when Mae was born with Down syndrome, it seemed like no one knew what to say to her.

“When you have a typical child, people tell you how beautiful they are,” says Susie. “With Mae, no one told us she was beautiful or that she would have a full life until we came to Boston Children’s Hospital. They believed in her from the first day.”

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Down syndrome: Reimagining what’s possible

Ella kisses baby Juila on the cheek.
Photo credit: Nicole Starr

I first met Ella Gray Cullen in the Advanced Fetal Care Center (AFCC) of Boston Children’s Hospital, shortly after she had received a prenatal diagnosis of Down syndrome. Like many parents expecting babies with conditions that can be diagnosed prenatally, she wanted to know more.

We talked about the additional medical screenings that would be recommended for her daughter to evaluate for cardiac defects and other conditions that are more common in children with Down syndrome. We discussed the developmental supports through Early Intervention and school that would be available to help her daughter learn and develop to her best ability. And, we talked about breastfeeding.

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Why Yoga is like food

Yoga1As far as Emily Davidson, MD, MPH, RYT, is concerned, claiming to not like yoga is like saying you don’t like food. “There’s a really big range of what kinds of yoga practices you can do,” she explains.

Davidson, who is the director of Boston Children’s Down syndrome Program, speaks from personal experience. She started practicing yoga in 1998 after she was diagnosed with coronary artery disease and discovered that, along with improving her flexibility and strength, yoga helped manage the stress of her diagnosis and treatment.

In fact, she liked it so much that she went on to complete a 200-hour yoga teaching program and set out to offer her patients with Down syndrome the same benefits she got from practicing it by launching a yoga class at Boston Children’s Primary Care at Martha Eliot.

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