Stories about: Dr. Phillip Pearl

Summer movie safety: What parents of kids with epilepsy should know

People sitting in a dark theater

If you’re headed to the movies over this holiday week, a word of caution about the popular Disney sequel Incredibles 2. Earlier this month, the Epilepsy Foundation issued a statement about the film, warning that some people have had seizures while watching the movie. In response, some movie theaters have posted warnings about the film.

Read Full Story

What can I do if there is no approved treatment for my child’s rare disease?

Just one tough question of many asked — and answered — during a social media Q+A held in observation of this year’s Rare Disease Day on February 28. Rare disease specialists, patients and advocates from across the country took to Twitter to offer their firsthand advice for dealing with a newly-diagnosed (or undiagnosable) rare disease. 

If your or your child’s rare disease does not yet have a treatment option, you can get involved in natural history research…

Over Twitter, our story headline and other questions were posed by the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) and The Mighty, a digital health community that empowers and connects people who are facing disease or disability. Dr. Phillip Pearl, who directs Epilepsy and Clinical Neurophysiology and studies inherited metabolic epilepsies at Boston Children’s Hospital, offered his recommendations through a series of tweets from the @BostonChildrens Twitter account.

Read Full Story

Looking to the future: Robot-assisted surgery offers hope for Brendan

Brendan is back at the bowling alley after surgery for epilepsy

Brendan Randolph focuses on the lane in front of him, takes a few steps and lets the ball fly down the lane. He waits to see where it lands and then turns back, grinning with satisfaction: With all ten pins down, it’s a strike. Bowling is one of his favorite pastimes, and he’s thrilled to be back at it. That’s no small feat for this 17-year-old, who underwent brain surgery just a few months ago.

Read Full Story

Care for epilepsy gets Aaron back in the game

Dr. Phillip Pearl

I had my first seizure when I was 10 years old and in fourth grade. We had been to a Celtics game the night before and I was just lying on the couch when I fell off and onto the floor. One of my brothers was in the room with me and called for my mom. It was really scary for all of us. About a week later, I had another seizure in my sleep, so my parents decided to take me to Boston Children’s Hospital to be evaluated.

Read Full Story