Stories about: Dr. John Emans

Miranda Day: More than a diagnosis

Miranda Day, who had scoliosis and a tethered spinal cord, poses with her surgeon, Dr. John Emans
Miranda Day and Dr. John Emans (PHOTOS: SEBASTIAN STANKIEWICZ/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL)

Miranda Day was born with a rare type of congenital scoliosis and a tethered spinal cord, a condition where the spine is split into two and entwined towards the tailbone. After her first surgery in her family’s home state of California, it became clear to doctors that it wouldn’t be her last. “Scoliosis isn’t life-threatening, but it can be a detriment to your well-being,” says Day. “My parents’ goal was to give me the best quality of life and not have any setbacks physically or otherwise.”

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A force to be reckoned with: Treatment for tracheomalacia helps Kate breathe easier

Kate is breathing easier after treatment for tracheomalacia

She’s only 8 years old, but Kate Elliott recently got a bit of an extreme makeover, donating 10 inches of her long sandy brown hair to the charity Locks of Love. Not only was she eager to see her tresses go to benefit a child in need, but she was also ready for a big change herself. “I want a whole new me,” she explained to her parents, Kristy and Todd.

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Chloe’s story: ‘It’s okay to be different’

spinal dysgenesis

In a lot of ways, I’m like any 13-year-old: I like to FaceTime with my friends, play with my younger brother Ethan and our three dogs and post selfies on Instagram. I also play clarinet and love to sew, knit, quilt and make other crafts. But I’m different, too — and I want other kids to know that it’s okay to be different.

I was born with spinal dysgenesis, which means that one of my vertebrae was out of place and pinching my spinal cord. As a result of the surgery to fix it, I have a problem called post-operative paraplegia — I can’t move my legs when I want to. I use a wheelchair to get around most of the time. I think of the chair as being part of me, but it doesn’t define me.

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Building a healthy heart through cardiac fitness

Joao, who has Ebstein's anomaly, poses in New York City. This spring, Joao DeToledo will be stepping onto the volleyball court to play for his high school team for the first time. It will be a proud moment for the high school senior from Somerville — playing a competitive sport is a goal he hadn’t dreamt possible just a few years ago. Though Joao has always loved sports, he was born with Ebstein’s anomaly, a congenital heart condition that, until recently, has forced him to spend a lot of time on the sidelines.

When Joao expressed frustration at not being able to participate in gym and sports as much as he’d like, his cardiologist, Dr. David Fulton, recommended the Cardiac Fitness Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. The program, one of the first of its kind, offers kids and adults with congenital heart disease a chance to exercise in a safe environment.

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