Stories about: Depression

Ask the Mediatrician: Should I let my child watch ’13 Reasons Why’?

Boston Children's experts weigh in on whether or not teens should watch 13 Reasons Why.

My daughter is 13. Her friends in middle school have recently become obsessed with the Netflix show, “13 Reasons Why.” I haven’t read the book or watched the show, but have been seeing a few news articles that worry me that the show may be dangerous for kids to watch graphic depictions of suicide, bullying and forced sex. My daughter feels that it is only “drama” (in the teen use of the word), and she’s been feeling left out of the conversation with her friends. Is it ok for me to let her watch it? ~ Just One Reason Why Not, USA

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Teens and depression: What parents need to know about treatment

ArmArm (3)Depression is a treatable condition. With treatment, teens can recover and live a full and active life. There is a continuum of depression along a spectrum of mild, moderate and severe.  A teen can move along this continuum depending on their response to treatment. Without treatment depression can worsen.

The factors contributing to and the treatment plan for each teen’s depression are unique. The treatment plan is developed in collaboration with the teen, family and caregivers and providers. Every plan is tailored to fit the unique needs of the teen and is consistently monitored to make sure it continues to be the best path.

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Ten ways to build healthy coping skills

Pathwoods (2)Healthy coping skills are an important part of stress management for teens. Parents can help their teen strengthen their ability to lead an emotionally healthy lifestyle and best manage feelings of stress, anxiety, anger, hurt, disappointment and sadness by promoting healthy coping skills.

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August highlights: Overcoming diabetes, asthma and more

Catch up on what you may have missed on Thriving last month. Our staff takes a look back at a few of this month’s favorite posts.

How to survive six months in the wilderness with type 1 diabetes

Hiking in Vermont

Rachel Hemond, an 18-year-old who has type 1 diabetes, doesn’t need much direction when it comes to survival. This winter, Rachel completed a 600-mile circumnavigation of Vermont by backcountry ski, white water canoe, rowboat and bicycle—and kept her diabetes under control.

Read more about how Rachel manages her diabetes.

Overcoming IBD obstacles…and traveling the world

Megan was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis on December 23, 2009—her life changed forever. She went from a healthy and active 14-year-old to a teen with some very concerning symptoms. A few years later, a decision to have surgery changed her life and allowed her to travel the globe.

Experience Megan’s journeys.

“When you hit rock bottom…the only way to go is up.”

Justin at his first 5K in 2014 and his second in 2015 after nine months of rehabilitation
Justin at his first 5K in 2014 and his second in 2015 after nine months of rehabilitation

The Franciscan Hospital for Children Heartbreak Hill 5K on June 14, 2014, was a special day for Justin Ith. It was the first time the 16-year-old, who weighed a mere 70 pounds at the time, had been outside for months. As a nurse pushed the wheelchair-bound teen across the finish line, he turned to her and vowed, “Next year, I’m going to finish this race by myself.”

Learn about Justin’s triumph.

Getting in the ring with asthma

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10-year-old Joel was diagnosed with asthma at age 2, which was difficult news for his mother Ellis. At age 6, a severe asthma attack landed Joel at Boston Children’s Hospital Department of Emergency Medicine with the risk of a collapsed lung. After spending two weeks in the hospital, Joel was released home and referred to Boston Children’s Community Asthma Initiative (CAI)—a free program that helps Boston-area families manage their child’s asthma at home.

Find out how Joel and Ellis keep his asthma under control.

5 things to know about teens and depression
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Depression impacts many youth and families across the U.S. Up to 28% of young people experience an episode of major depression by age 19 with an average onset age of 13 years old. However, only 38% of teens experiencing depression receive treatment. Raising awareness is a key step to addressing depression.

Learn how you can help teens with depression.

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