Stories about: Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center

How to manage family life when your child has cancer

Valerie Graf and family
Valerie, with husband Doron, son Evan and daughter Ruby

When our daughter, Ruby, was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) at one and a half years old, my husband and I were immediately transformed from working parents with two young children, to parental caregivers for a child with cancer. Between hospital stays, medications and appointments, there was so much to keep track of. It can be overwhelming at times, but there are ways to manage life after your child is diagnosed with cancer.

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A guide to childhood brain tumors

There are many different types and classifications of pediatric brain tumors, based upon cell structure, composition, rate of growth and location. A child’s tumor may have the same microscopic appearance to an adult tumor, but the mutations that cause its growth are completely different. Learn about the six most common types of childhood brain tumors.

  • 6 types of pediatric brain tumors

Find out more from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Center at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center.

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A parent’s guide to clinical trials

Photo of science lab

Children with life-threatening conditions, such as cancer, are often candidates for clinical trials. What are they? Which factors should parents weigh in determining whether enrolling in one is a good option for their child? Dr. Steven DuBois, director of the Advancing Childhood Cancer Therapies Clinic at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, answers questions about clinical trials.

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Gene therapy trial offers hope for Harry

Boy with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome holds father's hand.
Harry and his father at Dana/Farber-Boston Children’s

In their Brookline home-away-from-home, 2-year-old Duy Anh “Harry” Le plays with blocks and pop-up toys on the floor with his mother, Thao Nguyen. He is lively and happy, and his skin is clear. He looks almost nothing like the sickly baby covered in eczema who arrived in Boston from his native Vietnam in November of 2016 to participate in a gene therapy clinical trial for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

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