Stories about: congenital heart defect surgical performance

Happy 75th birthday, congenital heart defect surgery!

Robert Gross, MD

75 years ago Boston Children’s Hospital’s Robert Gross, MD, made medical history when he performed the first surgery to correct a congenital heart defect.

His patient was 7-year-old Lorraine Sweeney, from Brighton, Mass., who had been diagnosed with patent ductus arteriosus, a congenital heart defect consisting of a persistent abnormal opening between the pulmonary artery and the aorta. In 1938, it was generally a death sentence—but where others saw the impossible Gross, the chief surgical resident at Boston Children’s at the time, saw opportunity.

“If you look at the history of cardiac surgery,” says Boston Children’s Associate Anesthesiologist-in-Chief Mark Rockoff, MD, who also chairs the hospital’s Archives Program, “it essentially all started with Dr. Gross.”

After two years of successful animal experiments, Gross was certain that the defect could be corrected in a human being “without undue danger.” He lobbied for the opportunity to test his theory, despite skepticism from his peers, and direct opposition from William Ladd, MD, Boston Children’s surgeon-in-chief at the time, and Gross’s superior.

Undaunted, Gross waited until Ladd boarded a ship bound for a Europe. Then, with the blessing of Sweeney’s mother, he put his career on the line and performed a revolutionary surgery—tying off Sweeney’s patent ductus arteriosus, allowing normal flow of blood through her heart. “Dr. Gross told me that if I had died, he would never have worked again,” Sweeney recalls. “He would have ended up back on his family’s chicken farm.”

Read Full Story | 3 Comments | Leave a Comment

Children's in the news

Here at Children’s Hospital Boston, our staff prides itself on providing world-class care for every patient that comes through our doors. But when they’re not busy performing surgeries, setting bones or caring for patients, many of our clinicians are doing research that will shape the future of pediatrics, or discussing how those changes will impact everyday care for thousands of people. Here’s a quick round up of what Children’s employees have been discussing with the media this past week.

********

A safer and earlier way to determine if a fetus has Down syndrome is being studied

An article in The Los Angeles Times discusses new technology soon to be available that will allow women to know early in their pregnancy whether they are carrying a fetus with Down syndrome. Children’s Brian Skotko, MD, MPP, speaks with the paper about the new tests – which are noninvasive and will pose fewer risks to the mother and fetus than current prenatal testing—and the questions they raise.

Dr. Skotko wrote a similar piece for Thrive last week and has opened a wide debate on the subject of prenatal testing.

______________________________________________________

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment