Stories about: Children’s Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation (CAIR) about

Care for short bowel syndrome helps Ellie enjoy being a kid

treatment for short bowel syndrome at Boston Children's
Ellie and her dad, Gib

It’s a Thursday afternoon and Ellie Brogan is bubbling over with energy, greeting old friends and waving at others as they walk by. The 11-year-old, says her father, Gib, is “raring to go.” She’s a Girl Scout, plays viola and is in the cast of her school play, but today’s appointment is no typical afterschool activity. Instead, Ellie and her dad are paying their monthly visit to the Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation (CAIR) at Boston Children’s Hospital.

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Our patients' stories: From Russia with love

Because of the severity of her condition, Evelina had to be transported to Children's for treatment

When Victor Beletsky’s daughter was born in his native Moscow, he and his wife couldn’t have been happier. But shortly after Evelina’s birth doctors noticed she was having trouble eating and their joy quickly turned to panic. Evelina was born with a gastrointestinal tract disorder that led to her losing a significant portion of it, resulting in short bowel syndrome (SBS). SBS refers to any condition where a large portion of the small bowel is either missing (due to surgery or a variety of genetic and acquired disorders) or isn’t working properly for some other reason. With SBS, the body cannot adequately digest or absorb sugars, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals. Russian doctors quickly tried to rectify baby Evelina’s condition, and performed two emergency operations that removed almost 90 percent of her intestine.

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