Stories about: Child and Young Adult Hip Preservation Program

The PAO buddy system: Healing through connection

Leigh Lozano and Alyse Scanlon PAO patients Thriving lead image

For people with significant orthopedic hip conditions such as hip dysplasia, a periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a major surgery that can reduce or eliminate pain, while also increasing hip function. However, the post-op recovery and rehabilitation process can be long and sometimes painful.

“Recovery is an up and down process,” says Ariana Moccia, a nurse practitioner who works closely with patients in the Child and Young Adult Hip Preservation Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. “It’s important for patients to be able to share their frustrations and successes with somebody who really understands.” That’s why Ariana and orthopedic hip preservation surgeon Dr. Eduardo Novais have been working to connect prospective PAO patients with others who have already gone through the surgery.

Three of the patients who helped initiate the PAO “buddy system” at Boston Children’s share their experiences.

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What you should know about hip labral tears in young athletes

Dr. Young-Jo Kim hip labral tears Q&A lead image

Labral tears are a common injury in the hip, particularly with young athletes who may have underlying hip anatomy issues, such as hip dysplasia or impingement. Treatment for labral tears can range from rest and physical therapy to open surgery, with time away from sports spanning from days to weeks, or even months.

It’s important that any individual experiencing hip pain see a physician as soon as possible in order to limit pain and damage to the hip. Dr. Young-Jo Kim, a pediatric and young adult orthopedic hip specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital Orthopedic and Sports Medicine Center, discusses the causes of labral tears and his philosophy for treatment of this injury in young athletes.

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Teamwork and toughness: Living with cerebral palsy

María Sordo cerebral palsy Thriving lead image

Growing up in Querétaro, Mexico, María was an exceptionally bright and inquisitive child. At just 18 months old, she spoke at the level of a 6-year-old, and could even sing the tongue-twisting “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious” song. Her parents marveled at her intelligence at such a young age, but there was something in her development that seemed off.

“At 1 year, she wasn’t crawling well and had difficulty standing,” her mother, María José, recalls. “She hadn’t learned to walk by 18 months, and she would crawl by pulling her two legs at the same time — like a little bunny.” Her parents knew that something was wrong, so they took her to see a pediatrician in their home country of Mexico.

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Teagan’s triumphant return: Dancing after Perthes disease

Teagan Keefe dance pose lead image

Teagan has lived and breathed dance — ballet, jazz, tap, and more — since she was 5 years old. “It’s what makes me happy,” the now 12-year-old says. But two years ago, she started to feel pain in her hip that persisted after dance class and worsened over time. As her spring dance season wrapped up with four shows in two days, Teagan ended the final show with her pain at its worst.

But since her injury didn’t seem to be anything more than a minor muscle pull, her mother Jeannine had Teagan lay low over the summer, hoping that rest would help the pain go away. When dance classes started again in September, her dance teacher noticed that Teagan lacked the flexibility to do the moves she normally could. She recommended that Jeannine take her daughter to Boston Children’s.

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