Stories about: Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center

3D printing guides a tricky brain surgery

3D printingTwo and a half years ago, 15-year-old Adam Stedman had a seizure out of the blue.

“I heard a noise and went in and saw him in a full-blown tonic-clonic seizure,” says his mother, Amy.  Paramedics brought him to the hospital. Any further seizures could mean trouble, they told the Stedmans. “They said, basically, ‘you’re allowed one seizure in your life,’” Amy recalls.

A few months later, on an August evening around 10 p.m., Adam spoke with his girlfriend on the phone. She later told Amy, “Go check on him—he sounds kind of out of it.” That turned out to be a second seizure.

The third seizure, the worst yet, happened on Nov. 11. Adam had the day off from school, and his girlfriend was visiting. The family was eating dinner when the seizure started. It lasted nearly five minutes, and Adam was turning blue. Another seizure followed within weeks. The local hospital in Connecticut did an MRI, and the Stedmans received a call: “Can you come in before the office opens?”

Adam had an arteriovenous malformation, or AVM, a tangle of abnormally connected arteries and veins. Through a recommendation, the Stedmans met five days later with Dr. Edward Smith, a neurosurgeon in Boston Children’s Hospital’s Cerebrovascular Surgery and Interventions Center.

Because the AVM was in the visual processing area of his brain, Adam faced a risk of serious vision loss if the AVM wasn’t removed soon. It could bleed or burst at any time.

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