Stories about: Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Getting back into the swing of things: Jake’s journey with Crohn’s disease

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It was a cloudy, September day at the Country Club of Miami in South Florida. Jake Goodstat, a high school sophomore and varsity golfer, approached the ninth green. He walked up to his ball with putter in hand, took a deep breath and gently tapped the ball to make the putt.

He says this was the hole where he cinched second place in the 2016 South Florida Junior Golf Tournament.

“It was the greatest feeling in the world to know that I placed,” recalls Jake, a Florida teen who underwent surgery two months prior to treat his Crohn’s disease. “Before my surgery, I would register for a tournament, end up in the emergency room and be admitted to the hospital.”

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Inflammatory bowel disease: 6 tips for a new school year

IBD-Back-to-school-tipsA new school year presents a lot of new opportunities like new teachers, new subjects and the possibility of new friends. But that newness also comes with a good degree of uncertainty, which can be frightening for a student with a chronic illness, such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). That anxiety can be especially strong if the diagnosis is new, and the upcoming school year will be your child’s first with IBD.

“The first day of school after an IBD diagnosis can be hard, but with some planning it’s quite manageable,” says Dr. Michael Docktor, of the Boston Children’s Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center. “Most children with the condition are able to quickly return to their normal school routines. All it takes is a few extra steps to make the return as seamless as possible.”

Watch Dr. Michael Docktor’s caregiver video

To ensure school is a positive experience for your child with newly diagnosed IBD, Docktor suggests speaking with your child’s teachers, school administrator and nurse as soon as possible to discuss any concerns or questions you may have. Here are some tips to help prepare for a busy school year.

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“I’m the face behind the phone.”

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(Katherine C. Cohen/Boston Children’s Hospital)

 

Nikiay Kelly

Gastroenterology Scheduler, Care Team Member

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I answer frequently-asked questions using the live Web-chat feature, and I answer questions and schedule appointments by phone. I enjoy helping patients, especially when I see the impact on patient care.

I recently received a call from a new patient who wanted to see a doctor immediately. He was experiencing some stomach upset and was questioning whether he had IBD (inflammatory bowel disease.)

I was able to contact a doctor and quickly coordinate a consultation for a time that worked best for the patient. I felt really good at the end of the call because I got him the appointment and the care he needed.

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care-team-logoCaring for patients is a true team effort. Care Team highlights the dedication of the people throughout Boston Children’s who do their part to comfort and support patient families each and every day.

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Kaleb’s journey: Treating C-diff with fecal microbiota transplantation

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Bath time and bubbles, snuggling with Mom and playing hockey with his big brother are just a few of Kaleb’s favorite things.

But for the bright-eyed three-year-old from Massachusetts, things weren’t always so carefree.

Kaleb’s health changes: Battling ear infections and diarrhea

As an infant, Kaleb was a healthy baby boy. He was eating well and growing by leaps and bounds.

At six months, his health began to change. Multiple ear infections followed by numerous antibiotic treatments became a painful part of Kaleb’s young life.

As his first birthday approached, a second, unrelated condition emerged. Bouts of diarrhea were frequent. And as the days turned to weeks, the diarrhea intensified and his condition worsened.

“He wasn’t eating and was having up to 14 loose stools per day,” recalls Kaleb’s mother, Christine, a licensed practical nurse at an area medical center.

Stool cultures examined by Kaleb’s local pediatrician confirmed the toddler was battling more than ear infections. He was also battling Clostridium difficile, or C-diff, an infectious disease that causes debilitating diarrhea and is often prolonged with antibiotic use.

“As a nurse myself I was familiar with this infection. And though I was saddened by the news, I knew it was treatable,” Christine says.

Unfortunately, it wasn’t that easy.

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