Stories about: Center for Advanced Intestinal Rehabilitation

‘Not to be stopped’: Dorothy’s story

recovery from short bowel

Dorothy Hardy “doesn’t walk, she dances,” says her mom, Carrie. “She just waltzes around the house, singing songs she makes up. She’s not to be stopped.” In fact, when the little girl injured her leg at the playground, she taught herself to dance while wearing a cast. It’s a resilient, determined attitude that Dorothy — now two-and-a-half years old — has had since she was diagnosed with jejunal atresia as a newborn.

Read Full Story

Persevering after the unimaginable: Jacob’s journey with short bowel syndrome

little boy after treatment for short bowel syndrome

Yankees or Red Sox? Giants or Patriots? Rangers or Bruins? Seven-year-old Jacob Hersko and his physician, Dr. Christopher Duggan, may playfully debate whose hometown is better, but in one area, it’s clear that Boston comes out on top: “Jacob loves coming to Boston Children’s Hospital,” says his mother, Rachel. “He says it’s like going to Disney World.”

When she was pregnant with Jacob, Rachel and her husband, Geoff, never anticipated that they would be traveling to Boston every few months. The little boy was born at full-term, with no apparent complications. But when he was just a week old, the unimaginable happened: He was diagnosed with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a serious intestinal illness in babies that results in the death of intestinal tissues.

Read Full Story

Isaac’s story: A ‘new normal’ with short bowel syndrome

Isaac stays active with short bowel syndrome

It was the morning after their baby son Isaac had come home from the hospital, and Jennifer and Brian Campbell were performing the same sweet act of bonding as many new parents: giving him a bath in the sink. But as they maneuvered around the room, they suddenly realized something was very wrong. “I fell to the floor and started screaming and crying as formula shot out of his stomach,” remembers Jennifer. “I thought we’d broken him.”

The reality, of course, was that the Campbells were simply adjusting to their new “normal” — something any parent of a medically complex child can understand. Isaac wasn’t a newborn. He had finally been discharged from the hospital after nine months. And his parents hadn’t hurt him. They’d just accidentally pulled out his gastrostomy (G-tube), which provided his body with nutritional support.

Read Full Story

Whatever it takes: Fighting for Michael

Michael doesn't let short bowel syndrome keep him from enjoying sports

Michael stood at the top of the hill, staring down at the glittering white snow. The prospect of skiing to the bottom was scary — on previous trips, he’d refused to try, worried that he would fall. But this time was different. He was ready to take a chance. Attempting to balance without using poles, he pushed himself forward and glided through the powder as his family cheered him on. By the end of the day, the 8-year-old had sailed down the slopes five times, all by himself.

The accomplishment was even more meaningful for his parents, Bill and Lisa Smith, who have watched him fight to survive — and thrive — since he was an infant. “He had some issues with spitting up and turning blue and was diagnosed with acid reflux when he was about a month old,” says Bill. “But we had suspicions that something else was wrong.”

Read Full Story