Stories about: Boston Marathon

Lyle Micheli: 40 years at the Boston Marathon finish line

From marathon volunteer to injury prevention pioneer—it’s all part of Dr. Lyle Micheli’s mission to keep runners and athletes of all types on the field.

Sore quads. That’s one of Lyle Micheli’s memories from the 1975 Boston Marathon. But Dr. Micheli, Director of Boston Children’s Sports Medicine, wasn’t sore from running. As a medical volunteer at what was a “very informal” event in 1975, Micheli spent the day ducking and “limboing” under the ropes marking the last feet of the 26.2-mile run and making sure the athletes were OK to proceed beyond the finish area.

Since that day, running has gained tremendous popularity. The Boston Marathon has increased from a mere 1,000 runners in 1975 to 30,000 in 2015. Micheli has been at the finish line year after year as a way to give back to his beloved city and the historic race.

The medical tent has matured from an informal crew stocked with Bands-Aids, beef stew and water to a highly sophisticated organization, comprised of multiple teams of medical professionals with designated assignments.

Still, nothing prepared Micheli and other volunteers for 2013. “We weren’t equipped with life-saving equipment.”  Forty years earlier, as a member of the U.S. Air Force, Micheli had received evacuation training. It kicked in—he jerry-rigged a tourniquet from a runner’s jacket and triaged injured spectators.

Micheli will be on hand at the finish line again in 2015. While his primary motivation is community service, Micheli and Boston Children’s Sports Medicine staff and patients reap plenty of benefits from their commitment to the race. “We encourage all of our fellows to attend. It’s a model for mass casualty training.” Plus, the doctors learn by observing elite athletes.

In the last 10 years, for instance, the science of injury prevention has emerged. “We’ve learned how various running techniques and different shoes contribute to injury risk. We’re using this information to guide our Injured Runner’s Clinic at The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention in Waltham.”

For more on Micheli’s other accomplishments in the 1970s, learn how he improvised an innovative solution to solve the challenge of reconstructing a torn ACL in growing children.

 

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Why I’m running the Boston Marathon

This year’s 118th Boston Marathon represents many different things to the thousands of participants who will run 26.2 miles from Hopkinton, Mass. to Boston’s Copley Square. For some, it will offer closure—an opportunity to put the tragedy of last year’s events behind them. For others, it represents a new start—a chance to embark on a new path, inspired by those who have run before them.

Among those competing are several Boston Children’s Hospital employees, each with his or her own reasons for running…

Scott-Glynn “I’m running this year to complete my 3-year-goal of running a marathon, qualifying for the Boston Marathon and then running with the best runners in the world.”

Scott Glynn, Access Control Administrator, Security

 

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Lauren-Codd“I’m running for two reasons: to finish what I started last year and to push my own ability.”

Lauren Codd, MBA, Executive Assistant, Quality Program Department of Medicine

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Teachers, are you prepared for anniversary of Boston Marathon tragedy?

This blog was createdby Boston Childrens Hospital Neighborhood Partnerships through its partnership with the Boston Public Schools and made possible with support from the Patriots’ Day Project, a charitable Fund established by Fidelity Investments® employees in an effort to help our community heal.

empty schoolWith the one-year anniversary of the Boston Marathon bombings approaching, it’s likely that the wave of media coverage recalling the tragedy could raise questions or concerns in children. Of course, parents will play a large role in helping answer these questions and letting children know they’re safe, but teachers also will be very important in reassuring children.

School should be a safe haven for children—a place to talk to peers and trusted adults about what they are seeing and hearing—which helps them process the world around them. When that world seems frightening or overwhelming, educators know that they need to do everything in their power to support students.

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Boston Children’s Running Program hosts seminar

If your child—young or old—aspires to be a runner, the Runner’s Program at Boston Children’s can help them get off on the right foot. The Sports Medicine experts that will help your child also deliver the same world-class care to world-class athletes at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

We all know that running is a great way for kids to get exercise and have fun, but since 35 to 75 percent of runners each year need medical treatment for running-related injuries, running safely is important. Pierre d’Hemecourt, MD of Boston Children’s Division of Sports is presenting at the Runners’ Seminar Series for the Boston Marathon, and talks to us about Children’s Running Program, which helps runners of all ages run as safely as possible.

The Running Program mainly focuses on best practices and injury prevention tools for kids, high school and college athletes, as well as adults.

“We want to encourage running,” says d’Hemecourt, “but in doing so, we want to show runners how they can prevent injuries and stay healthy.” The program’s plan does just that, and when a patient comes in for an appointment, they go through four 15-minute stations of clinical help.

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