Stories about: athletes

Reducing knee injury risk in young athletes

soccer acl injury

Young athletes benefit from playing sports in a variety of ways — from better fitness and overall health to higher self-esteem and improved academic achievement. But with this participation comes the risk of injury.

While some injuries build up over time and cause pain that is often ignored, others may be random and unexpected. Dr. Dennis Kramer, a sports medicine orthopedic surgeon at Boston Children’s Hospital, explains what may put an athlete at risk for an overuse injury and how to minimize the risk of traumatic injuries, such as an ACL tear.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Grabbing the reins her own way

Chloe, a roder rider with brachial plexus, rides a horse during a barrel race.
Chloe Neff, a rodeo rider with brachial plexus birth palsy, will compete in barrel racing world championships. 

Barrel racing isn’t for the faint-hearted, that’s for sure.

In this rodeo event, horses and riders whip around barrels at lightning speeds. Tails flourish in the air and muscles ripple. Powerful horses are coaxed by their riders to spin around each barrel as quickly as possible.

One such duo, 16-year-old Chloe Neff and her horse, Raise a Glass Dancer, will soon be on their way to barrel racing’s world championships.

“If you keep trying and working at it, you can do anything you want to,” says Chloe. Her record for completing a barrel course is 16.6 seconds. “Right now, Glass and I are working toward a 15.”

In the Perry, Georgia, stadium where barrel racing world championships will be held later this year, Chloe’s parents may be the only people to notice anything seemingly different about Chloe, as she and Glass flash past the stands. That’s because Chloe, who has received care from the Brachial Plexus Program at Boston Children’s Hospital since she was 5 months old, sustained damage to her left brachial plexus nerve when she was born. The injury jeopardized Chloe’s use of her left shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Buddy system benefits athletes with hip dysplasia

college soccer player kristina who had hip dysplasia The buddy system is great. It helps keep buddies safe, secure and confident. When you’re a college athlete facing two major surgeries (called periacetabular osteotomy or PAO) to correct hip dysplasia in one year, a buddy can be a lifeline.

Until she was 18, Kristina Simonson had been one of those lucky athletes who escaped injury season after season. The Babson College student started playing soccer at 5 and entered college as a two-sport athlete—soccer and lacrosse.

She began experiencing hip pain her freshman year in college. Her trainer suspected it might be a torn labrum, or a rip in the seal that normally cushions the hip joint. He was right … but only partially.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Coaches and alcohol: young athletes need leaders, not friends

A Massachusetts high school hockey coach is under investigation following allegations that underage drinking took place in his team’s locker room, possibly with his consent. Dale Dunbar—long-time coach of the Winthrop hockey team and former pro-hockey player—is currently on administrative leave while police and school officials review surveillance tapes to see if he, or other members of the coaching staff, provided teenage players with alcohol or had knowledge of their drinking after a tough season-ending loss in a state tournament.

A police officer driving by the rink noticed that on the night of the big loss there were several lights on and a suspicious amount of movement inside the rink, especially considering it was practically midnight. When he entered the rink’s locker room, he found team members and two coaches, along with empty beer cans. The officer said he smelled alcohol in the air, but he did not report seeing any minors drinking.

The actual events of that night, and whether or not Dunbar violated any laws, will no doubt come to light as the investigation continues. In the meantime, the media coverage around the story could have some parents wondering about the behavior of their own kids’ coaches.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment