Stories about: allergy cure

Health headlines: Mozart helps preemies, children’s allergies and teen brains really are different

Other stories we’ve been reading:

teen brainPsychologist wins $1 million for showing that teen brains really are different. Researchers are able to show that remedial reading classes for weak readers really can change young brains. A history of juvenile delinquency is linked to early death in men.

If your children have cavities, it’s much more likely they’ll become adults with cavities. An Israeli study found that premature babies listening to Mozart were able to grow faster. Children born to mothers exposed to microbes during pregnancy may be less likely to develop allergies.

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A cure for milk allergies – Part 8: Will Brett be cured of his milk allergy?

Brett Nasuti is Children’s first patient to go through a new trial that could cure him of his severe food allergy. In this final video on our series, Brett finds out if he passes the final milk challenge in the study—which culminates in him drinking a full 8-ounce glass of milk—and if he’s cured. If he passes the challenge, there’s an enormous pizza party in store for him.

Click here to read our story about Brett, Children’s milk allergy trial and experts’ latest thinking about food allergies.

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This week on Thrive: Oct. 5 – 9

Here’s a quick look at what Thrive was up to last week.

Canada is delaying its seasonal-flu vaccine program. Should we be worried? There are an alarmingly high number of glass-table injuries involving children. Six months after Children’s Hospital Boston’s Division of Emergency Medicine published a study on these injuries, new standards have been recommended in the production of glass-tables. A Children’s study showed that side effects or accidental overdoses of medications in children are more common than you might think. In part 7 of our milk allergy series, Robyn Nasuti shares her tips on keeping her kitchen safe. French Parliament wants to pass a law that would mandate a bold print notice when images have been digitally enhanced. Children’s Alison Field, ScD, who specializes in eating disorders, talks about what we can do to educate our children about images in the media. We follow one family’s story when they discovered their child, Ann Louise, showed signs of a congenital heart defect. Children’s David Ludwig, MD, addresses the soda-tax solution in an opinion piece for the Los Angeles Times. The HealthMap team gives their weekly H1N1 update. The Mediatrician weighs in on what computer games, if any, are good for a 2-year-old.

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This week on Thrive: Sept. 21-27

Here’s a quick look at what Thrive was up to last week.

After suffering a severe spinal cord injury, Jason Fowler took back control of his life and has gone on to compete in a variety of physically challenging races. Should your child get the H1N1 shot? Adrienne Randolph,MD, MSc, from Children’s Medical/Surgical ICU says, YES, you should. We brought you Part 5 of our milk allergy series where celebrity chef Ming Tsai talks about the challenges of eating out with a child who has food allergies. Last week, Massachusetts lawmakers proposed a new state bill aimed at minimizing concussion injuries in youth athletes that would force coaches, trainers, parent volunteers and others affiliated with school athletic programs to be trained in recognizing potentially concussed athletes. A mother shared her story of having to put contact lenses in her two young children’s eyes. Groundbreaking new guidelines about how to treat children with Gender Identity Disorder have been issued by the Endocrine Society. And James Mandell, MD, Children’s Hospital Boston’s CEO, shares why health care workers need to get vaccinated.

If none of this tickles your fancy, let us know what pediatric health or science issue you’d like to hear about.

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