Stories about: Aerodigestive Center

Reflux in babies: Four things to know

mother holding baby with reflux
PHOTO: ADOBE STOCK

Most adults are familiar with gastroesophageal reflux, or the movement of stomach contents up into the esophagus. For us, reflux is usually caused by lifestyle choices, such as eating heavy, fatty foods, smoking or drinking too much coffee. In grownups, unmistakable symptoms like heartburn and burping are signs of acid reflux.

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Enjoying the little things: Aerodigestive care for Abby

Abigail goes skiing with her family after aerodigestive treatment
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE HURLBURT FAMILY

Abigail Hurlburt is a true Vermont girl. She loves horseback riding, swimming, skiing and camping. But when she drew a picture titled, “Things I’m Thankful For,” the focus was something far simpler: a glass of milk. It was a sign that — after a rough start — she’s finally able to enjoy the little things in life.

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Investing in Esmé: More than aerodigestive care

Esme sits with her parents in the Aerodigestive Center
PHOTOS: SOPHIE FABBRI/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Esmé Savoie is pretty sure she’s going to marry Walter someday. There are some barriers: Esmé lives in upstate New York; Walter now resides in Los Angeles. Esmé is 7 years old and Walter is several years older. And while Esmé is a human little girl, Walter is a Muppet. Differences aside, however, it’s no surprise that they’re soul mates. Both are silly, determined — and finding their own unique place in the world.

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Taking a leap of faith: Jack says goodbye to his G-tube

Jack colors in a coloring book before having his G-tube removed
PHOTOS: SOPHIE FABBRI/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

As they waited for their son Jack’s appointment, Marika and Josh Reuling had no indication that July 17, 2018, would be different from any other day. They chatted, glanced at the cartoons playing in the waiting room and handed Jack crayon after crayon as he happily colored a picture. It seemed like a just another routine check-up with Dr. Rachel Rosen, director of the Aerodigestive Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.

But once the Reulings were settled in an exam room and Jack had sampled a variety of foods as part of an evaluation with feeding specialist Kara Larson, Rosen had a surprise for them. “What do you think about taking out Jack’s G-tube today?” she asked.

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