Transgender protections: Keeping kids safe

a gender neutral restroom for transgender people
PHOTO: ADOBE STOCK

The next time you need to use a public restroom, stand outside the door and take a moment to think about which one you should use. Would you feel safer in the ladies’ room, or would using the men’s room make you more comfortable? Now consider that the average person urinates between six and eight times a day — more often if they’re drinking a lot of fluids. Imagine facing this dilemma every time you feel the urge.

Read Full Story

Nicole’s Story: Dancing my way through pain

Nicole Zizzi dancer hip dysplasia PAO Thriving blog lead image
PHOTO COURTESY OF MICKEY WEST PHOTOGRAPHY

Dance is my life passion.

I’ve spent more than 15 hours a week dancing for most of my 26 years — except for a period of time the past few years, when hip pain forced me to stop.

We dancers usually don’t express our pain; in fact, we almost like to be in pain because it means we’re working hard and improving. So, when I woke up one morning two years ago and I couldn’t lift my left leg, I knew something was very wrong. This pain was too intense to ignore.

Read Full Story

Working together for pain relief

Nadiya poses on a boat after receiving pain relief
PHOTOS COURTESY OF NADIYA ROY

When asked what she loves about lacrosse, 19-year-old Nadiya Roy pauses, searching for an answer. It’s not that she doesn’t know why she enjoys the sport — she can’t choose just one aspect of it. “I like the fast pace,” she says finally. “I love that it involves such teamwork. Even if you’re not the best individual player, if you work together, you can succeed.”

Read Full Story

Sajni walks among the stars: A parent’s perspective

Sajni, pictured here with a horse, was diagnosed with DIPG when she was just 7 years old.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF CHAKRABARTI FAMILY

In honor of Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, Prabal Chakrabarti writes about his daughter Sajni. 

Our daughter Sajni Chakrabarti was only 7 and a half years old when she was diagnosed with a very aggressive form of brain cancer –  diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) – and given only nine months to live.

Sajni loved life and learning. She spoke French fluently, played the violin and read avidly. And after she became sick, even as she struggled and was sad, she kept her bright-eyed glow and laughter all the way through. She still aimed to change the world, even writing a letter to the White House on climate change.

Read Full Story