A look back: Our most popular stories of 2018

Top stories of 2018
PHOTO DESIGN: SEBASTIAN STANKIEWICZ/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

As 2018 comes to a close, we’re taking a look back at some of our most popular stories from the past year, from ground-breaking surgery and clinical trials to stories of unbelievable courage and hope.

Thank you to the many families and patients who kindly shared their stories with us in 2018. As always, you continue to inspire us.


Zack says he always knew he felt different. “I hated my body,” he remembers. “I thought, ‘I’m not the same as other kids and this isn’t okay.’” It wasn’t until he was in high school that he learned the word transgender and what that meant. The realization was a turning point. Read about Zack’s journey to finding himself.


Feb. 13, 2017 started off as any other day in the Linskey household. Although the snow was falling outside, Sarah, Chris, Charlotte and their dog, Axel, were cozy as they went about their morning routine. Three months pregnant with baby Nolan and struggling with morning sickness, Sarah went to lie down. That’s when she heard a horrifying growl and ear-splitting scream. Axel, the family’s black lab mix, had clamped down on Charlotte’s face. Read Charlotte’s story of recovery.


Reagan was born with  a perineal fistula — a type of anorectal malformation in which the anus is located outside the sphincter muscle and in the incorrect location. She needed surgery when she was just 4 months old to correct the problem. Now a year old, Reagan is bouncing back.


Eli and his mom traveled from Atlanta to Boston looking for hope in treating Eli’s aplastic anemia, a rare blood disorder that occurs when the body’s bone marrow stops producing enough new blood cells. Learn how a phase 2 clinical trial may allow Eli’s bone marrow to heal itself, eliminating the need for a bone marrow transplant.


When Kate was 4 years old, she was diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a relatively uncommon disease that comes with a lifetime diagnosis. Five years ago, she learned she was qualified to enroll in the beginning phases of a clinical trial for a drug, now known as Spinraza. Read about her new life with SMA, after Spinraza.