H1N1 vaccination starts at Children's

Eleven year-old Kerimal Suriel receives an H1N1 swine flu vaccine at Children's on October 7, 2009. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Eleven year-old Kerimal Suriel receives an H1N1 swine flu vaccine at Children's on October 7, 2009. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Children’s Hospital Boston received and started distributing its first doses of the mist version of the H1N1 vaccine yesterday. A photographer from Reuters was on hand to capture the moment. Watch the audio slideshow he put together.

While you’re here, check out why one of our ICU physicians believes everyone should vaccinate their children against H1N1, why Children’s CEO James Mandell, MD, believes it’s every health care worker’s responsibility to get vaccinated against both types of flu, what a Children’s physician has to say about thimerosal, squalene and Guillain-Barre and a new iPhone app that lets you track disease outbreaks in real-time.

  • christine smith

    Will H1N1 vaccinations be distributed to staff? If so, where and when can the doses be picked up by the Flu ambassadors for the departments?

    • Hi Christine,

      Small amounts of the injectable (killed virus) H1N1 vaccine have begun to arrive in Pharmacy, and Occupational Health Services and Infection Control are working out when and how to distribute the vaccine for staff immunizations. An announcement from Drs. Sandora and Mandell about this will go out on Monday. As soon as we know more about the timing for distribution to the ambassadors and the clinics, it will be posted on Children’s Today or another e-mail will go out.

      Thanks for your patience,

      Bess Andrews
      Director of Public Affairs
      Children’s Hospital Boston

  • The best treatment for influenza infections in humans is prevention by vaccination. Work by several laboratories has recently produced vaccines. The first vaccine released in early October 2009 was a nasal spray vaccine. It is approved for use in healthy individuals ages 2 through 49.

  • The best treatment for influenza infections in humans is prevention by vaccination. Work by several laboratories has recently produced vaccines. The first vaccine released in early October 2009 was a nasal spray vaccine. It is approved for use in healthy individuals ages 2 through 49.