Stories about: Parenting

Retro parenting: Three things we should go back to doing

Children playing in the mud

The world is a different place than it was when I grew up in the 1960s and 1970s. Mostly, that’s a good thing. There are so many ways that technology has made life easier and better, the internet has brought knowledge to our fingertips and connections that span the world — and as a physician, I am grateful for all the life-saving discoveries of the past few decades.

However, when it comes to parenting, not all the changes have been good.

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A 3-year-old’s love for his mother: ‘We do all the fun stuff together’

Boy with amblyopia and sister and mother
Photo credit: Jill DiChiara Photography 

Our son, Jack, was diagnosed with amblyopia at 18-months-old. Now he’s 3 and a very busy big brother to Lyla. We are so thankful his condition was detected early, helping Dr. Bharti Gangwani, an ophthalmologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, improve his vision quickly. Jack’s world is so much clearer now.

This Mother’s Day, I asked Jack a few questions about my wife, Erin — his “mumma.”

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Vaping, JUULing and e-cigarettes: What teens and parents need to know

A guide for parents and teens on e-cigarettes“Which flavor is this? Cherry cheese cake? French vanilla? Crème brûlée?” If you are a teen in high school these days, chances are that you’ve already asked yourself this question and have inhaled at least a few breaths of some of the powerful scents coming from a JUUL or other type of e-cigarette.

The popularity of electronic cigarettes has increased exponentially in the past five years: nearly one in three seniors in high school say that they have used an e-cigarette in the past year. The FDA has recently released a statement warning about the risks of vaping and supporting strict regulations to avoid exposure to e-cigarettes for children and teens. But are e-cigarettes all that bad?

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Helping your child manage scoliosis and brace-wearing

Managing scoliosis Thriving blog lead image

For children and adolescents who are prescribed a brace to help correct their idiopathic scoliosis, it can be a long road to straightening their curve. Bracing takes commitment and patience, but the end goal is to correct a patient’s curved spine and avoid surgical treatment.

Dr. Michael Glotzbecker, an orthopedic surgeon in the Spinal Program at Boston Children’s Hospital Orthopedics and Sports Medicine Center, and Deborah Cranford, a nurse at Boston Children’s who works closely with scoliosis patients, provide insights and tips on how parents can help their children better manage their scoliosis treatment.

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