Stories about: Kids’ Safety

Ask the Mediatrician: Should kids watch movies with smoking scenes?

Ask the Mediatrician: Smoking in Films
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: PATRICK BIBBINS/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

I’ve seen news stories about the dangers of kids seeing smoking in movies. I’m a bit confused, as I no longer thought smoking was really an issue, especially in kids’ movies (G, PG, PG-13) and that smoking in general, is on the decline. Is this something I should still be concerned about when I take my 10-year-old to the movies?

~Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, Boston, MA

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Sledding, ice skating and more: Top tips for winter sports safety

Winter-safety-sportsIf you aren’t traveling to a warmer climate this season, outdoor winter activities — sledding, skiing, snowboarding and more, are likely part of your family’s plans.

Dr. Michael O’Brien, director of the Boston Children’s Hospital Sports Concussion Clinic, says when it comes to winter sports, fun and exercise outweigh the risk. But you do need to be careful.

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Transgender protections: Keeping kids safe

a gender neutral restroom for transgender people
PHOTO: ADOBE STOCK

The next time you need to use a public restroom, stand outside the door and take a moment to think about which one you should use. Would you feel safer in the ladies’ room, or would using the men’s room make you more comfortable? Now consider that the average person urinates between six and eight times a day — more often if they’re drinking a lot of fluids. Imagine facing this dilemma every time you feel the urge.

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Concussions: Prevention and recovery for soccer players

Dr. O'Brien concussions in soccer players thriving lead image
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: PATRICK BIBBINS/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

As kids and teens get ready for the start of a new school year, many will be lacing up their cleats in anticipation of the coming soccer season. Playing soccer brings together all the benefits of rigorous exercise, fun with friends and an unlimited abundance of orange slices. However, participation also comes with the risk of injury.

Concussions, a type of traumatic brain injury, are all too common in the soccer world. It’s clear that the protection mouth guards provide is far from sufficient for protecting your child from a concussion. So, if soccer’s protective equipment can’t keep players safe, what can?

Dr. Michael O’Brien, director of the Sports Concussion Clinic at Boston Children’s Hospital, helps athletes who have sustained concussions get back in the game and works with athletes to prevent sports injuries, including concussions. His advice to players, parents and coaches on what athletes can do to reduce the risks of concussions revolves around effective and clear communication.

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