Stories about: Kids’ Safety

Ask the Mediatrician: Should kids watch movies with smoking scenes?

Ask the Mediatrician: Smoking in Films
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: PATRICK BIBBINS/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

I’ve seen news stories about the dangers of kids seeing smoking in movies. I’m a bit confused, as I no longer thought smoking was really an issue, especially in kids’ movies (G, PG, PG-13) and that smoking in general, is on the decline. Is this something I should still be concerned about when I take my 10-year-old to the movies?

~Smoke Gets in Your Eyes, Boston, MA

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Sledding, ice skating and more: Top tips for winter sports safety

Winter-safety-sportsIf you aren’t traveling to a warmer climate this season, outdoor winter activities — sledding, skiing, snowboarding and more, are likely part of your family’s plans.

Dr. Michael O’Brien, director of the Boston Children’s Hospital Sports Concussion Clinic, says when it comes to winter sports, fun and exercise outweigh the risk. But you do need to be careful.

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Transgender protections: Keeping kids safe

a gender neutral restroom for transgender people
PHOTO: ADOBE STOCK

The next time you need to use a public restroom, stand outside the door and take a moment to think about which one you should use. Would you feel safer in the ladies’ room, or would using the men’s room make you more comfortable? Now consider that the average person urinates between six and eight times a day — more often if they’re drinking a lot of fluids. Imagine facing this dilemma every time you feel the urge.

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Gun violence and children: Why it’s a public health issue

pediatric gun deaths
Images by Patrick Bibbins

“There have been more than 52,000 pediatric firearm deaths in the past 18 years,” says Dr. Eric Fleegler, a pediatric emergency physician at Boston Children’s Hospital as he kicks off his talk. It’s May 3, 2018, and he’s sharing the startling statistic with a rapt audience at the hospital’s Special Grand Rounds on Trauma and Gun Violence.

Later that same day, a 10-year-old Ohio boy will be shot in the face while he sleeps in bed, one of 11 bullets to enter his home during a drive-by shooting. Three North Dakota siblings ages 6 to 14 will be murdered by their mother — who will then kill herself — with a handgun. The following day, a 3-year-old South Carolina boy will fatally shoot himself in the head while playing with a gun he finds at a family friend’s home.

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