Stories about: In the News

Health care reform: ‘This is the time to act’

Boston Children's Hospital helps families understand the AHCA.
Sandra L. Fenwick, Boston Children’s Hospital President and CEO, far right, joins patients, families and staff at Family Advocacy Day in Washington, D.C., June 2016.

Since the new year began, we’ve been working hard to educate everyone — our employees, staff, volunteers, patients, families and friends — about what the conversation about health care in Washington D.C., means for children. We have very serious concerns about the possible impact that the efforts to quickly repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) could have on our patients and their families.

Many of you share our concerns and have demonstrated this to us time and again. Maybe you came to our Special Grand Rounds held on May 31, shared The Hill op-ed authored by our President and CEO, Sandra L. Fenwick, with your social media networks or participated in our Facebook Live discussion about the legislation.

The Facebook Live discussion actually took place just as the Senate Republican leadership released its version of a health care reform bill, known as the Better Care Reconciliation Act. We wanted to provide a brief update to our community, particularly as we approach a critical window of activity in Congress.

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Thank you for making Boston Children’s #1

The 2017-18 U.S. News & World Report “Best Children’s Hospitals” rankings were released this morning, and Boston Children’s Hospital has been named the #1 children’s hospital in the nation.

The U.S. News rankings are about more than just reputation. They’re based on four key elements — reputation, patient outcomes, patient safety and care-related factors such as the amount of nurse staffing and the breadth of patient services. They rely most heavily on outcomes — in other words, were we able to make a difference?

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How to stay safe on the football field: Learning from the NCAA

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Even with the known risk of injury, football is as popular as ever among kids and teens. How can parents encourage their QBs-in-training to enjoy playing the game while staying safe? Dr. William MeehanBoston Children’s Sports Medicine physician and director of The Micheli Center for Sports Injury Prevention says the answer is clear: Follow the rules.

Meehan participated in the development of a new policy released in January by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) limiting contact in year-round college football practice. He says, these regulations “should translate to a decreased incidence of concussion.”

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A new option for kids with severe allergies

(image credit: CVS)

For parents of children with severe allergies, keeping our kids safe in the event of an allergic reaction is a priority. We rid our houses of allergens, we write detailed allergy plans for caretakers and we stock up on Epinephrine, the medication that will save our kids if they ever experience anaphylaxis.

Epinephrine auto-injectors are expensive, they expire every year even if unused, and we have to purchase multiples for home, school, and elsewhere. Which is why we’re thrilled that CVS now offers a generic Epinephrine auto-injector for $109.99 per two-pack — that’s about a sixth of the cost of Epi-pen and a third of the cost of Mylan’s generic version.

Before heading out to CVS to stock up, we checked in with Dr. John Lee, clinical director of the Food Allergy Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. “This new Epinephrine auto-injector from CVS can be used safely for anaphylaxis,” assures Dr. Lee. “It provides the same medication and the same dosing as the Epi-pen,” though he warns the mechanisms differ. He urges anyone caring for a child with a life-threatening allergy to be trained on how to use each brand.

Above all, Dr. Lee insists caretakers carry an Epinephrine auto-injector at all times — “no matter which one it is,” he emphasizes.

Learn about Boston Children’s Hospital’s Food Allergy Program.

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