Stories about: Caregivers

When nursing runs in the family

For some, being a nurse at Boston Children’s Hospital is a family affair. In this video, meet a few of the men and women who care for patients and families alongside their own siblings, parents, children and spouses:

  • Sisters-in-law Shanna Barker (MICU) and Kelly Wietecha (MICU)
  • Caitlin Dolan (Center for Inflammatory Bowel Disease) and her mother Kathy Waddicor (Adolescent Medicine)
  • Sisters Michelle Audain (MSICU) and Pascale Audain (MICU)
  • Pat Pratt (Nursing Director of Patient Services — Procedure Units) and her daughter Amy Sparrow (Center for Motility and Functional Disorders)
  • Paula Conrad (MICU) and her niece Emily O’Brien (Intermediate Care Program)
  • Jean Gouthro (General Medicine) and her niece Karin Gavin (General Medicine)
  • Twin sisters Julia Perkins (Enteral Tube Program) and Rosella Micalizzi (Colorectal and Pelvic Malformation Center)
  • Liz Sacco (CICU) and her mother Patricia Burke-Sacco (Day Surgery)
  • Sisters Megan Dube (Inpatient Gastroenterology) and Denise Currier (Intermediate Care Program)
  • Michael Greenlee (Cardiac ICU) and his wife Lisa Greenlee (Cardiac ICU)

Learn more about Nursing at Boston Children’s Hospital.

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Double take: The special approach that corrected one child’s vision overnight

Dr. David Hunter, pictured here, corrected Eliza's crossed eye at Boston Children's Hospital
Dr. David Hunter is a pioneer in detecting and treating children’s eye conditions with a range of new and tried-and-true technologies and techniques.

“At school I was seeing double today, Mom,” said 9-year-old Eliza in May of 2015. Catherine hadn’t noticed her daughter’s eyes crossing and suspected that her fourth grader was simply tired.

A few weeks later, however, Catherine and her husband were sitting in the front row at Eliza’s chorus concert, when suddenly they both noticed their daughter’s eye was crossed. It was Eliza’s 10th birthday.

“She was fine one day, and then the next her eyes weren’t working together,” says Catherine. “It was terrifying.”

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Epilepsy: Top tips and tricks from our staff

In honor of Epilepsy Awareness Month, some of the nurses and social workers who support the Boston Children’s Hospital Epilepsy Center share their top epilepsy tips.

Chris, a social worker in the Epilpsy Center

Chris’s tip: Get support!

Chris Ryan, LCSW, recommends that you consider therapy for your child or family — or both. Kids with epilepsy are at higher risk for behavioral and mental health conditions, like anxiety, depression and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). They may also struggle with the lifestyle restrictions epilepsy can cause. A therapist can help your child learn to cope with these conditions.

Chris says joining a support group can also help kids with epilepsy — and their families — learn how to adjust to living with epilepsy.

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Tummy talk: Treating stomach aches and pains


Stomach aches and pains

It’s the same morning ritual. You rush around to get your child dressed, make her breakfast and try to get her off to school on time.

But one morning, your daughter refuses to eat her breakfast and complains that her tummy hurts. Is it something she ate? Constipation?

Stomach aches are very common. Almost 25 percent of school age kids complain of intermittent (on and off) stomach pain that lasts more than two months.

Rest assured, while stomach pain can happen for any number of reasons, the discomfort is usually short term, and children continue to maintain their overall good health.

“Often, a stomach ache is not cause for concern,” says Dr. Lori Zimmerman, a gastroenterologist with Boston Children’s Hospital Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. “More often, it might mean a child is constipated or withholding her stool, is sensitive to a certain food (possibly lactose intolerance), is too hungry or too full or is worried and feeling the stress in her stomach.”

Dr. Zimmerman offers the following tips and home remedies to help alleviate stomach pain and discomfort.

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