Stories about: Ask the Expert

Athletes at risk: Knowing the dangers of heat stroke

exertional heat stroke athletes

For many young athletes, fall sports practices have already started. Whether it’s football two-a-days, soccer practices on a sweltering turf field, or cross country training in the late summer sun, the threat of heat exhaustion and heat stroke is prevalent across all sports.

It’s an important time for athletes and parents to be aware of the signs of heat illnesses, especially given that children and adolescents are more susceptible to heat stroke than adults. Younger athletes produce more heat during activity, sweat less, and adjust less rapidly to changes in environmental heat.

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A parent’s guide to clinical trials

Photo of science lab

Children with life-threatening conditions, such as cancer, are often candidates for clinical trials. What are they? Which factors should parents weigh in determining whether enrolling in one is a good option for their child? Dr. Steven DuBois, director of the Advancing Childhood Cancer Therapies Clinic at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, answers questions about clinical trials.

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Reducing knee injury risk in young athletes

soccer acl injury

Young athletes benefit from playing sports in a variety of ways — from better fitness and overall health to higher self-esteem and improved academic achievement. But with this participation comes the risk of injury.

While some injuries build up over time and cause pain that is often ignored, others may be random and unexpected. Dr. Dennis Kramer, a sports medicine orthopedic surgeon at Boston Children’s Hospital, explains what may put an athlete at risk for an overuse injury and how to minimize the risk of traumatic injuries, such as an ACL tear.

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Cavernous malformations: What parents need to know

They’re among the more common cerebrovascular problems in kids. But few parents have heard of cavernous malformations until their own child is diagnosed. These small masses are comprised of abnormal, thin-walled blood vessels. While they can occur anywhere in the body, they’re most likely to cause problems when they form in the brain and spinal cord.

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