Stories about: Ask the Expert

Ask the expert: What is the female athlete triad and how can it be prevented?

Female athlete triad

The spring athletics season is in full swing and for those at the high school and college level, practices and game schedules can be intense. When you blend this physical commitment with the demands of a hectic academic schedule, sometimes maintaining healthy eating habits and positive energy balance can be challenging.

Dr. Kathryn Ackerman, medical director of Boston Children’s Female Athlete Program, shares important information about a condition called the female athlete triad and offers tools to keep young athletes healthy, energized and at the top of their game.

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Ask the expert: What is the best way to correct my child’s crossed eye?

Image of Dr. David Hunter, an expert at using Botox to correct crossed eyes
Dr. David Hunter is experienced in using traditional strabismus surgery and Botox injection to correct a child’s crossed eye.

If you see that your child’s eye has become crossed, or he or she complains of having double vision, you may be struggling to find clear answers about what caused this to happen and the best way to get your child’s eyes working together again.

When the sudden onset of an inward-turning crossed eye doesn’t respond to glasses and isn’t associated with other systemic or structural disease, it’s known as acute comitant esotropia. This condition is quite rare and usually requires prompt surgical intervention.

Strabismus: Misaligned eye(s)
Esotropia: Inward-turning (“crossed”) eye(s)
Comitant: Eye misalignment stays the same throughout full range of gaze

Until recently, the only treatment for acute comitant esotropia has been traditional strabismus (misaligned eye) surgery.

But more recently, injection of medical-grade botulinum toxin (Botox) has been used to correct esotropia.

So, how do you know if Botox injection is appropriate for correcting your child’s esotropia? Dr. David Hunter, Ophthalmologist-in-Chief at Boston Children’s Hospital, answers questions about the differences between strabismus surgery and Botox injection.

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The only kids who need vitamins (spoiler alert: there aren’t many)

Gummy vitamins for children.

As a pediatrician, I get a lot of questions whether their children should take a multivitamin or other vitamin supplement. Parents think they will make their children healthier — and some think they will make them eat more (they don’t, sorry). Since our bodies need different vitamins to be healthy, they ask,

Should I give my child a multivitamin?

Not necessarily, actually. It turns out that most children don’t need them, making them an expensive waste of money. They can also be dangerous if children take too many, something that is very possible given that most chewable multivitamins for children taste like candy. And giving a vitamin can give families a false sense of security that their child is getting everything they need — when they aren’t.

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Ask the Mediatrician: Is it OK for my baby to video chat with his grandparents?

Grandmother doing a Facetime video chat with granddaughter at brunch.

I’d like to video chat with my 3-month-old grandson on my phone. His parents are concerned that the video emitted from the screen will affect his brain development and eyes. Any advice will be helpful! ~ Nana, New York, NY

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