Stories about: Ask the Expert

6 questions answered about anxiety in children and teens

Focus on anxietyBetween school and social demands, lots of children feel stress, but at what point does anxiety cross the line and become a mental health concern? We sat down with Keneisha Sinclair-McBride, PhD, a clinical psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry at Boston Children’s, to better understand what separates serious forms of anxiety from normal worrying, whether seeing a therapist is warranted and how to handle anxiety at home.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

4 questions parents have about moyamoya disease

moyamoya disease questions and answers

Last month, families from across the country gathered at Boston Children’s Hospital to celebrate World Moyamoya Day. The expert speakers at the Moyamoya Family Day Symposium shared the latest information about this rare but very serious condition with parents and patients alike.

Moyamoya disease occurs when the walls of the internal carotid arteries — the vessels that supply blood to important areas of the brain — become thickened and narrowed. As a result, blood flow to the brain slows, making blood clots more likely. Kids with moyamoya disease are at significantly higher risk of having a stroke, as well as other complications such as seizures and cognitive problems.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children: What parents need to know

UTIsWhen Lauren was just under two years old, she developed a fever of 103, was irritable and lost her appetite. Mom, who suspected her daughter’s condition was more than “just a bug,” scheduled an appointment with Lauren’s pediatrician.

Based on her symptoms and physical examination, Lauren was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection (UTI). The tiny tot was treated and quickly felt better.

Unfortunately, the relief was short-lived. To mom’s surprise, the UTI returned.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Caring for the female athlete: A guide for athletes, parents and coaches

Female-AthleteSince the passage of Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, the number of girls competing in high school sports has increased from 295,000 to nearly 3.2 million, and more women are playing collegiate sports than ever before. As these numbers continue to rise, and girls and young women become more empowered through sports, awareness of the health issues specific to female athletes has become increasingly important.

Dr. Kathryn Ackerman, medical director of Boston Children’s Female Athlete Program, and the program’s sports dietitian, Laura Moretti, share need-to-know information and offer strategies to keep young athletes healthy, on and off the field.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment