Author: Saul Wisnia

Landon: Cancer-free after neuroblastoma treatment

Landon, who was treated for neuroblastoma, rides a scooter
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE CATO FAMILY

The first year of a baby’s life is filled with milestones, but between sitting and standing up, holding his bottle and playing peek-a-boo, there was one thing Landon Cato developed his parents never anticipated: cancer.

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Cole: Having a ball after CAR T-cell therapy

Cole, who received CART T-cell therapy for ALL, poses with his twin brother before a baseball game.
Cole, left, and his brother, Michael [PHOTOS COURTESY OF MALONE FAMILY]

After undergoing a promising new treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Cole Malone is back to doing what he loves: playing on a flag football team with his twin brother, Michael.

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Manny: Hoping new research helps others with sickle cell disease

Manny, who is in a clinical trial for sickle cell disease, is examined by his doctor.
Manny at a visit with Dr. Esrick [PHOTO: SAM OGDEN/DANA FARBER]
Emmanuel “Manny” Johnson, Jr., shares many loves with his little brother, Aiden — from basketball to video games. One thing he wishes they did not share is sickle cell disease (SCD), so Manny is playing a role in a new effort to improve treatment for patients like 7-year-old Aiden, himself and others living with the inherited blood disorder.

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Spencer gets back on the court after cancer

Spencer is back on the court after cancer.

For much of his 17 years, Spencer Riley has lived to play basketball. This winter, his favorite sport helped the teenager get back to life.

Riley was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 2016 and treated at Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center that summer. He underwent an intensive three-month treatment cycle: one week of inpatient chemotherapy at Boston Children’s Hospital, two weeks of recuperation at home, and then back to Boston Children’s.

While occasionally well enough to go on family outings, he was still too weak to shoot or even dribble a basketball.

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