Author: Lisa Fratt

Too hip for dysplasia

developmental dysplasia of hip Thirty-something moms Tosha LoSurdo and Jessica Rohrick have been friends since college. In 2015, both learned they were pregnant for the first time. They thought they might share similar sagas as new moms — diapers, sleepless nights and teething. They didn’t expect to bond over infant hip dysplasia.

When Tosha’s daughter Carmela was born on Feb. 4 at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, the pediatrician noticed her hips were a little “clicky.” She was told the connection between the femoral head (top of her thigh bone) and hip socket wasn’t stable, and Carmela might have developmental dysplasia of the hip; Carmela was referred to Dr. Eduardo Novais, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon and hip specialist in the Boston Children’s Hospital Orthopedic Center and Child and Young Adult Hip Preservation Program, who examined her before she was discharged home.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Second opinion gives unborn baby second chance

fetal second opinionSeven-month-old Charlotte Bent is hitting all of her developmental milestones — smiling, laughing, playing peek-a-boo, bearing weight on her legs. Her parents, Jennifer and Keith, are overjoyed.

“It’s a complete 180-degree turn from where we thought we would be this time last year,” says Jennifer.

After struggling to conceive their second child, the couple was thrilled when Jennifer became pregnant. The results of genetic testing were normal and confirmed they would be welcoming a daughter in April.

Jennifer felt the baby’s first kicks on Nov. 23, 2015.

The next day, she was scheduled for an anatomy scan. “At first, everything seemed normal,” recalls Jennifer. But as the obstetrician was helping her from the exam table, he looked at Jennifer. “I have some concerns,” he told her.

“My heart dropped,” she says. Joy turned to devastation.

“I think your baby is missing part of her brain,” the obstetrician said.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Elijah laughs: Augmentative communication device helps boy with cerebral palsy

augmentative communicationA computer voice utters a simple statement. Sometimes, it’s “My name is Elijah.” Other times, “My parents are Brian and Leah,” or “I feel happy.”

For the first time in his life, Elijah can tell his mother, ‘Yes, I want a hug.’

Another phrase — “I love the Patriots” — is often repeated.

And a brown-eyed, curly-haired kindergartener’s eyes light up. He smiles and laughs out loud.

It’s a whole new world for 5-year-old Elijah Gauthier, says his mom, Leah.

Leah and her husband Brian have taken Elijah, who has severe cerebral palsy and is non-verbal, to the Augmentative Communication Program at Boston Children’s Hospital at Waltham since he was a baby.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment

Olympian D’Agostino shares 3 lessons after ACL injury

ACL injury“The crux of Olympic competition is to do everything you can to be the first one to cross the finish line,” says Abbey D’Agostino. But that’s not what Abbey did during the 5,000-meter qualifying heats in the 2016 summer games.

Abbey had trained for her Olympic moment for years, adhering to the rigid 24/7 lifestyle of an elite athlete since graduating from Dartmouth College and signing to run professionally with New Balance.

Abbey’s Olympic moment came unexpectedly when she and New Zealand runner Nikki Hamblin collided and tumbled to the ground.

What happened at the Olympics is an example we should be talking about in youth sports. It’s not just about achievement. It’s about sportsmanship.

Abbey ignored her training, her coach’s advice, her dreams.

She stopped and extended her hand to Nikki, and the pair hobbled through the final mile of the event side by side.

“What happened at the Olympics is an example we should be talking about in youth sports. It’s not just about achievement. It’s about sportsmanship,” says Dr. Mininder Kocher, associate director of Boston Children’s Hospital Sports Medicine.

There were a few things Abbey didn’t know during that fateful mile. She would be diagnosed with a devastating injury: a complete tear of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), a meniscus tear and a strained medial collateral ligament. She and Nikki would be awarded the Pierre de Coubertin medal for Olympic spirit. And her team would expand.

Physical therapist Carl Gustafson would join Team Abbey, along with her coach Mark Coogan and Kocher, a world-renowned knee surgeon.

Read Full Story | Leave a Comment