Author: Jessica Cerretani

A world of difference: Postsurgical pain relief for Will

Will poses with a Curious George doll after receiving pain relief for surgery
PHOTOS: MICHAEL GODERRE/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Will is a good-natured, active boy who loves riding his bike, playing with LEGOs and caring for his family’s two cats. So when he emerged from anesthesia following surgery to release a tethered spinal cord last August, it was clear he wasn’t feeling like himself. “He would be very combative and then very sleepy, explains Kathleen. “I just kept saying, ‘That’s not him.’” Kathleen and her husband, Eric, later learned that Will’s behavior was a consequence of the morphine he was being given to treat his postsurgical pain.

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First Event provides resources and bonding opportunity for transgender community

transgender and lgbtq flag
PHOTO: ADOBE STOCK

It’s natural to have health questions — especially if you or your child is transgender. No matter where you are in your gender affirmation journey, you may wonder whether surgery is an option, how to tackle insurance-related issues and how to navigate the health care system. For nearly four decades, First Event Conference has provided transgender and non-binary people and their families education, support and resources for addressing these and other topics affecting this community.

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Harper’s bright future after care for esophageal atresia

Harper smiles at her appointment for esophageal atresia
PHOTOS: MICHAEL GODERRE/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

At age 4, Harper Robinson doesn’t really remember most of the clinicians who helped change her life — but that doesn’t stop her from greeting Dr. Russell Jennings with a big smile at a recent appointment. “Whenever Harper had surgery, he would cut her dressings into the shape of a heart,” says her mom, Jessica, of Jennings, surgical director of the Esophageal and Airway Treatment (EAT) Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.

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In the nick of time: Kayley’s life-saving treatment for midaortic syndrome

teenager with midaortic syndrome
PHOTOS: COURTESY OF THE ESTEVES FAMILY

At 10, Kayley Esteves could often be found on the soccer field, dribbling a ball up and down the grass. She seemed the picture of health, but when she started experiencing chest pains, her mother, Sue, brought her to their local hospital. An initial chest x-ray revealed nothing. “But something still didn’t seem right,” remembers Sue. She made an appointment with a cardiologist at Boston Children’s Hospital, where Kayley had previously received care.

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