Author: Jessica Cerretani

Worth the fight: Finding care for short bowel syndrome

smiling baby with short bowel syndrome
PHOTOS: MICHAEL GODERRE/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

When Hannah Lillie meets someone new, she’s likely to smile and blow them a big kiss. The friendly, wide-eyed toddler loves being the center of attention — but when she was just 3 weeks old, she and her parents, Layne and Ryan, found themselves in the middle of a medical whirlwind they could never have expected. When she suddenly began vomiting and turning blue during a routine feeding, her parents rushed to their local emergency department.

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Reflux in babies: Four things to know

mother holding baby with reflux
PHOTO: ADOBE STOCK

Most adults are familiar with gastroesophageal reflux, or the movement of stomach contents up into the esophagus. For us, reflux is usually caused by lifestyle choices, such as eating heavy, fatty foods, smoking or drinking too much coffee. In grownups, unmistakable symptoms like heartburn and burping are signs of acid reflux.

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Organ donation: Sorting myths from facts

donate life month
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: DAVID CHRISOM/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Every April, the Pediatric Transplant Center at Boston Children’s Hospital honors Donate Life Month by raising awareness and celebrating lives saved because of organ donation. Part of raising awareness involves addressing the many myths and misconceptions that surround the process. For example, the majority of Americans support organ donation, but only 58 percent actually register to become an organ donor. That’s likely due in part to misinformation about organ donation. Here’s the truth behind six common myths.

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On the move: Care for cerebral palsy helps enhance Joseph’s mobility

boy with cerebral palsy watches a red sox game
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ROMAN FAMILY

Joseph Roman is happiest on the basketball court — in fact, he loves the sport so much that if his mother, Alba, is running late on her way to pick him up for practice, he’ll send an anxious text or two to make sure she knows he can’t miss it. The 12-year-old, who has cerebral palsy, has been playing the adaptive sport for three years on a team made up of mostly adults. But the age difference doesn’t slow him down. “It’s wonderful to watch him enjoying himself so much,” says Alba.

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