Author: Jessica Cerretani

Reflux in babies: Four things to know

mother holding baby with reflux
PHOTO: ADOBE STOCK

Most adults are familiar with gastroesophageal reflux, or the movement of stomach contents up into the esophagus. For us, reflux is usually caused by lifestyle choices, such as eating heavy, fatty foods, smoking or drinking too much coffee. In grownups, unmistakable symptoms like heartburn and burping are signs of acid reflux.

Read Full Story

Organ donation: Sorting myths from facts

donate life month
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: DAVID CHRISOM/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Every April, the Pediatric Transplant Center at Boston Children’s Hospital honors Donate Life Month by raising awareness and celebrating lives saved because of organ donation. Part of raising awareness involves addressing the many myths and misconceptions that surround the process. For example, the majority of Americans support organ donation, but only 58 percent actually register to become an organ donor. That’s likely due in part to misinformation about organ donation. Here’s the truth behind six common myths.

Read Full Story

On the move: Care for cerebral palsy helps enhance Joseph’s mobility

boy with cerebral palsy watches a red sox game
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ROMAN FAMILY

Joseph Roman is happiest on the basketball court — in fact, he loves the sport so much that if his mother, Alba, is running late on her way to pick him up for practice, he’ll send an anxious text or two to make sure she knows he can’t miss it. The 12-year-old, who has cerebral palsy, has been playing the adaptive sport for three years on a team made up of mostly adults. But the age difference doesn’t slow him down. “It’s wonderful to watch him enjoying himself so much,” says Alba.

Read Full Story

No holding her back: Robotic procedure gives girl freedom from urinary incontinence

little girl on the beach after robotic artificial urinary sphincter implantation
PHOTOS COURTESY OF MADI’S FAMILY

Seven-year-old Madi loves being active, whether that means dancing, doing gymnastics or riding her bike. Born with spina bifida, she doesn’t let the diagnosis slow her down — but the chronic urinary incontinence it can cause was disruptive and stressful. Known as neurogenic bladder, this condition occurs when the nerves to the bladder and urethral sphincter do not work properly and can lead to urinary retention or persistent urinary leakage.

Read Full Story