Author: Jessica Cerretani

Living his best life: Caring for Christian

little boy with short bowel syndrome wearing a fedora
PHOTOS: MICHAEL GODERRE/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Christian Jaspersen was wet, muddy — and having the time of his life. After an ATV ride around his family’s rural Oklahoma farm with their grandfather, he and his two older brothers plopped themselves into a nearby mud puddle, playing with toy trucks and getting wonderfully messy. “For a while, we didn’t know if Christian would be able to have a ‘normal’ childhood,” says his mother, Rachel. “Having these experiences now is just so special.”

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Transgender Day of Remembrance: Fostering acceptance

person holds a candle to recognize Transgender Day of Remembrance
PHOTO: ADOBE STOCK

Every November 20, we recognize the Transgender Day of Remembrance, which memorializes people who have lost their lives due to anti-transgender violence.

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Team Irvin: Care for cerebral palsy helps him reach his goals

teen with cerebral palsy gives a thumbs up with his doctor
Irvin and his friend Dr. Fogelman [PHOTOS: MICHAEL GODERRE/BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL]
Boomer is a legendary thunderbird. Paws is a scruffy, fun-loving dog. Nestor is a friendly owl. But these three different characters have one thing in common: They’re all the alter-egos of Irvin Rodriguez. At just 13, Irvin is enjoying a burgeoning career as a professional mascot, representing sports teams near his home in Western Massachusetts.

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Making the decision: Choosing MAGIC for midaortic syndrome

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE RICE FAMILY/PHOTOS BELOW BY SOPHIE FABBRI AT BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Several years ago, the Rice family wouldn’t have imagined that they would be traveling some 2,000 miles across the country for care. But after their youngest son, Quinn, was diagnosed with midaortic syndrome, they knew they had to make the trip. In this rare but serious condition, the part of the aorta (the heart’s largest blood vessel) that runs through the chest and abdomen is narrow, leading to reduced blood flow. Midaortic syndrome can cause dangerously high blood pressure and can be life threatening if left untreated.

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