Author: Andrea Duggan

Health headlines: Bullying, MDs in movies + an ACL breakthrough

Miracles_from_Heaven

Catch up with the latest news about Boston Children’s Hospital. One doctor talks about being portrayed in a popular movie, while another focuses on talking to kids about bullying, and a team reveals a potential breakthrough in ACL surgery.

Want more? Read these news stories, and see how they impact our patients.

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Health headlines: Mold in sippy cups, HPV vaccine data and the school start-time debate

 toddler sippy cup

Yes, mold can grow inside a child’s sippy cup

Healthline and New England Cable News report parents across the country are outraged after discovering mold on their child’s Tommee Tippee sippy cups despite following cleaning instructions.

Dr. Claire McCarthy, a pediatrician at Boston Children’s Hospital, explains mold growing inside a sippy cup is — while startling — likely quite common and not all molds are toxic. McCarthy adds if a child is having new, unusual symptoms or an unexplained rash, it is worthwhile to call a doctor.

HPV sharply reduced in teenage girls following vaccine, study says

The New York Times reports a vaccine introduced a decade ago to combat the sexually transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer has already reduced the virus’s prevalence in teenage girls by almost two-thirds, according to federal researchers.

Should Massachusetts high schools begin classes later in the morning?

The state legislature is considering a bill to study the issue of pushing high school start-times later statewide.

Boston Children’s Dr. Judith Owens is in favor of the later start-times, telling The Boston Globe, it’s not healthy if you are asking teenagers to get up at 5:30 or 6 a.m. — their lowest point of alertness in their 24-hour cycle. The Barrington Courier Review (Chicago) also covered the subject and interviewed  Owens.

Learn more about the HPV vaccine.

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Health headlines: Focusing on hospital safety, using zebrafish to understand cancer and fixing ACL tears with a sponge

Cleaning

Boston Children’s Hospital’s doctors and researchers are constantly working to uncover and understand health and medical questions. Health Headlines is a twice-monthly summary of some of the most important research findings and news.

Top news this week includes how hospitals are changing to become safer, how zebrafish are helping cancer researchers make strides and how sponges are being used to repair torn ACLs.

How hospitals are changing to become safer

The New York Times “Opinionator” blog reports patient safety experts say that medical errors are more a function of faulty systems than faulty people. In recent years, with leadership from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at Johns Hopkins Medicine, federal programs like the Partnership for Patients and numerous hospitals have made focused efforts to reduce harm.

Scientists watch as healthy cells turn into melanoma

Medscape reports on new research from Boston Children’s Hospital’s Dr. Leonard Zon, that finds zebrafish can be used to visually track melanoma as it begins. Researchers believe this work could have significant implications for cancer therapeutics, in that it provides clues for stopping cancer before it even begins.

Can a sponge fix athletes’ knees?

The Wall Street Journal features research from Boston Children’s Dr. Martha Murray, that is currently in the first safety trials in humans. Dr. Murray and Boston Children’s Dr. Lyle Micheli are inserting a sponge roughly the size of a thumb to serve as a bridge between the torn strands of the ACL and flushing it with the patient’s blood. That serves as a stimulus to make a bridge grow essentially encouraging the ACL to repair itself.

Learn more about Boston Children’s ACL Program.

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Health headlines: Boosting brainpower, treating overuse injuries and the latest on food allergies

Health headlines

Boston Children’s Hospital’s doctors and researchers are constantly working to uncover and understand health and medical questions. Health Headlines is a twice-monthly summary of some of the most important research findings.

Top news this week includes research focused on how early learning experiences shape development, a report on recovery from overuse injuries and a study on the relationship between blood cells and allergies.

How home visits for vulnerable moms boost kids’ brainpower

PBS News Hour reports on how rapidly expanding medical program for low-income first-time mothers combines social services with the latest in brain science. Dr. Charles Nelson, of Boston Children’s Hospital, is interviewed about his on-going research that focuses on a child’s early learning experiences and how it can shape their developing brain and impact early learning.

The best way for teens to recover from overuse injuries

The Wall Street Journal reports on overuse injuries when unrecognized and untreated they can sideline athletes from play and lead to more serious injuries and disability. Dr. Lyle Micheli, an orthopedic surgeon and director of Boston Children’s Hospital Sports Medicine, was interviewed for the article.

Blood cells could determine whether kids get allergies

A new study suggests one reason why children develop sometimes lethal food allergies. At birth, their blood is rich in cells that can promote a hyperactive immune response.  Dr. Oliver Burton, a researcher from Boston Children’s Hospital, provides insight in the Science Magazine article.

Learn more about food allergies in children.

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