Surgery to remove blood clot saves London’s kidneys

London, who had a large blood clot in her aorta, recovers after surgery.Todd and Lindsey Taylor had barely settled in at home in Syracuse, New York with their new baby, London, when their world turned upside down.

London, who had seemed perfectly healthy at birth, woke up nine days later vomiting and struggling to breathe. They rushed her to their local children’s hospital.

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New treatment for SMA offers hope for Arianna

Arianna, who has SMA, is improving after treatment.For the first few months of Arianna Condon’s life, everything was moving along fine. She was a happy baby, and seemed to be developing much like her older sister, Tessa.

“She was gaining weight, and seemed to be doing great,” says Arianna’s mom, Marina. “She did have problems with reflux, but it was nothing too unusual for a baby.”

But by the time Arianna was 3 months old, Marina started to have concerns. Arianna wasn’t lifting her head the way Tessa had at that age. Something didn’t seem right.

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Coming of age in a Snapchat world: How do I keep my child safe?

How to keep your kids safe on social media

Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr, YouTube, Snapchat, WhatsApp, Reddit. As a parent, your instinct is always to protect your child. But how 
do you protect them in the ever-evolving digital landscape? Social media has become a part of our everyday lives and is changing the way we interact with the world around us. According to a study by Common Sense Media, teenagers use an average of nine hours of entertainment media a day and tweens (ages 8-12) use an average of six hours per day. This does not include using media for school or homework.

What is the long-term impact of this amount of media exposure on the developing brain? We don’t yet know. What we do know is that it is impossible to prevent your child from using social media. So, how can you help them use it safely?

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Building a healthy heart through cardiac fitness

Joao, who has Ebstein's anomaly, poses in New York City. This spring, Joao DeToledo will be stepping onto the volleyball court to play for his high school team for the first time. It will be a proud moment for the high school senior from Somerville — playing a competitive sport is a goal he hadn’t dreamt possible just a few years ago. Though Joao has always loved sports, he was born with Ebstein’s anomaly, a congenital heart condition that, until recently, has forced him to spend a lot of time on the sidelines.

When Joao expressed frustration at not being able to participate in gym and sports as much as he’d like, his cardiologist, Dr. David Fulton, recommended the Cardiac Fitness Program at Boston Children’s Hospital. The program, one of the first of its kind, offers kids and adults with congenital heart disease a chance to exercise in a safe environment.

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